Topics

Youth On The Air camp

Jef - N5JEF
 


"... the Youth on the Air (YOTA) committee in IARU Region 2 has announced the first camp for young radio amateurs in the Americas next June."

"... the camp will focus on building peer and mentor relationships and taking amateur radio “to the next level.” Campers will attend workshops and activities in multiple STEM-related subjects, such as radio contesting, electronic kit building, D-Star, APRS, satellite communication, antenna building, and radio direction finding and orienteering. A high-altitude balloon launch is also being planned" 

I think this topic is worth sharing with the club because adding younger members is critical to the ongoing growth and viability of Amateur Radio and the precious frequency spectra allocated to us.  

It's not clear to me that kids these days are much impressed that we can speak into a piece of equipment and carry on a conversation with someone thousands of miles away.  But radio-controlled robotics, telemetry (as with balloons), radio direction finding as a sport, personal communication via satellite, and the various aspects of emergency communication and preparedness (especially in light of our repeated power outages) may be areas where we can focus and plant some radio-electronics-engineering seeds in the minds of our youth.

For next year's JOTA, I think I would like to set up an array of four or more microwave dishes on 5GHz and demonstrate video, audio, text, and maybe remote control some devices through that network, as well as let kids reposition, realign, reflect, and block the antennas and get a feel for the physics too.

- Jef

Orion, AI6JB
 

Very exciting news!  And a microwave obstacle course sounds like  a lot of fun.  Can’t wait to see it.

 

Radio Direction Finding, aka Fox Hunting, as a sport would be a great focus group for the Club and also an interactive activity for next year’s JOTA.  Anyone interested?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jef - N5JEF
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2019 12:19
To: w6ek@groups.io
Subject: [from W6EK Groups.io] Youth On The Air camp

 

 

"... the Youth on the Air (YOTA) committee in IARU Region 2 has announced the first camp for young radio amateurs in the Americas next June."

 

"... the camp will focus on building peer and mentor relationships and taking amateur radio “to the next level.” Campers will attend workshops and activities in multiple STEM-related subjects, such as radio contesting, electronic kit building, D-Star, APRS, satellite communication, antenna building, and radio direction finding and orienteering. A high-altitude balloon launch is also being planned" 

 

I think this topic is worth sharing with the club because adding younger members is critical to the ongoing growth and viability of Amateur Radio and the precious frequency spectra allocated to us.  

 

It's not clear to me that kids these days are much impressed that we can speak into a piece of equipment and carry on a conversation with someone thousands of miles away.  But radio-controlled robotics, telemetry (as with balloons), radio direction finding as a sport, personal communication via satellite, and the various aspects of emergency communication and preparedness (especially in light of our repeated power outages) may be areas where we can focus and plant some radio-electronics-engineering seeds in the minds of our youth.

 

For next year's JOTA, I think I would like to set up an array of four or more microwave dishes on 5GHz and demonstrate video, audio, text, and maybe remote control some devices through that network, as well as let kids reposition, realign, reflect, and block the antennas and get a feel for the physics too.

 

- Jef

Jef - N5JEF
 

Orion -

I hadn't thought of presenting it as an obstacle course, but that could be a fun approach.  Will have to think carefully, however, about documenting safe radiation limits and getting appropriate consent I suppose...

- Jef 

On Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 12:39 PM <ojendres@...> wrote:

Very exciting news!  And a microwave obstacle course sounds like  a lot of fun.  Can’t wait to see it.

 

Radio Direction Finding, aka Fox Hunting, as a sport would be a great focus group for the Club and also an interactive activity for next year’s JOTA.  Anyone interested?

 

Nathan Chilton - K6NDC
 

I think fox hunting could be a lot of fun and I expect the kids at JOTA would find it intriguing.  

Greg D
 

I gotta stop reading email when I'm hungry.  The image that first flashed through my head when I read "microwave dishes" was a line of kids playing hop-scotch with a pattern of frozen TV Dinners.

Didn't we have a presentation a year or two ago with someone from the Bay Area who did fox hunting, and who was willing to help us organize one?  Or, I bet we could do something where kids would do a fox hunt with their cell phones, using a Wi-Fi router as the "fox".  Add a directional antenna and aim it at the side of a building some distance away, and it could be fun to see where it takes them.

Greg  KO6TH


Jef - N5JEF wrote:

Orion -

I hadn't thought of presenting it as an obstacle course, but that could be a fun approach.  Will have to think carefully, however, about documenting safe radiation limits and getting appropriate consent I suppose...

- Jef 

On Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 12:39 PM <ojendres@...> wrote:

Very exciting news!  And a microwave obstacle course sounds like  a lot of fun.  Can’t wait to see it.

 

Radio Direction Finding, aka Fox Hunting, as a sport would be a great focus group for the Club and also an interactive activity for next year’s JOTA.  Anyone interested?

 


Nathan Chilton - K6NDC
 

Byonics has some foxes available.  They have one that is a controller, designed to be attached to a Baofeng UV-5R and they also have one that is small enough that it can fit inside a film canister (with the exception of the antenna).

Orion, AI6JB
 

Yes, Bill Ragsdale, K6KN, from Woodland is more than willing to come out on a Saturday and get us started.  He offered again this year when I requested permission to use the W6BSA callsign.

 

I would say if we had at least 6 folks interested, me included, I will coordinate a date with him in January?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

From: Greg D <ko6th.greg@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2019 19:17
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; jef@...; Orion Endres <ojendres@...>
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Youth On The Air camp

 

I gotta stop reading email when I'm hungry.  The image that first flashed through my head when I read "microwave dishes" was a line of kids playing hop-scotch with a pattern of frozen TV Dinners.

Didn't we have a presentation a year or two ago with someone from the Bay Area who did fox hunting, and who was willing to help us organize one?  Or, I bet we could do something where kids would do a fox hunt with their cell phones, using a Wi-Fi router as the "fox".  Add a directional antenna and aim it at the side of a building some distance away, and it could be fun to see where it takes them.

Greg  KO6TH

Jef - N5JEF wrote:

Orion -

 

I hadn't thought of presenting it as an obstacle course, but that could be a fun approach.  Will have to think carefully, however, about documenting safe radiation limits and getting appropriate consent I suppose...

 

- Jef 

 

On Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 12:39 PM <ojendres@...> wrote:

Very exciting news!  And a microwave obstacle course sounds like  a lot of fun.  Can’t wait to see it.

 

Radio Direction Finding, aka Fox Hunting, as a sport would be a great focus group for the Club and also an interactive activity for next year’s JOTA.  Anyone interested?

 

 

Nathan Chilton - K6NDC
 

I'd be interested, Orion!  (That makes two/six)

Michael - N6MRP
 

Nathan:

The kids will ask: What's a film canister? What's film?

Mike KK6GLP



On Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 8:43 PM Nathan Chilton - K6NDC <k6ndc@...> wrote:
Byonics has some foxes available.  They have one that is a controller, designed to be attached to a Baofeng UV-5R and they also have one that is small enough that it can fit inside a film canister (with the exception of the antenna).

Jef - N5JEF
 

My first thought viewing these products on the web was "Where can you get film canisters these days?"

You may know this--but I did not--that film canisters are still easily available on Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Microlab-Scientific-FCFR-224-Film-Canisters/dp/B00IMUBZFY

Could be good for other tiny electronic projects too--and of course Altoids tins when you need professional-quality shielding.  ;-)

- Jef

- Jef

On Sat, Nov 16, 2019 at 7:30 AM Michael - KK6GLP <mrprry2@...> wrote:
Nathan:

The kids will ask: What's a film canister? What's film?

Mike KK6GLP



On Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 8:43 PM Nathan Chilton - K6NDC <k6ndc@...> wrote:
Byonics has some foxes available.  They have one that is a controller, designed to be attached to a Baofeng UV-5R and they also have one that is small enough that it can fit inside a film canister (with the exception of the antenna).

Nathan Chilton - K6NDC
 

Indeed!  Most kids aren't going to have any idea what film is!

"Film" is a fascinating invention that reproduces the image-capturing functionality of a digital camera's sensor using a chemical emulsion which is applied to a transparent, flexible substrate.

This is what the "fox" looks like, when encased within a film canister and with an antenna attached:

Greg D
 

That looks, um, vaguely medical. Nice work by whoever built it.

What I'm intrigued by is the descriptive text on the Amazon site, talking about the film cans' use in making Canister Rockets.  Rockets?  That sounds like fun.

Greg  KO6TH


Nathan Chilton - K6NDC wrote:

Indeed!  Most kids aren't going to have any idea what film is!

"Film" is a fascinating invention that reproduces the image-capturing functionality of a digital camera's sensor using a chemical emulsion which is applied to a transparent, flexible substrate.

This is what the "fox" looks like, when encased within a film canister and with an antenna attached:

Jef - N5JEF
 

Greg -

Yeah, I know what you mean.  Rocket radio telemetry could be very fun and exciting.  ;-)

- Jef

On Sat, Nov 16, 2019 at 4:09 PM Greg D <ko6th.greg@...> wrote:
That looks, um, vaguely medical. Nice work by whoever built it.

What I'm intrigued by is the descriptive text on the Amazon site, talking about the film cans' use in making Canister Rockets.  Rockets?  That sounds like fun.

Greg  KO6TH


Nathan Chilton - K6NDC wrote:
Indeed!  Most kids aren't going to have any idea what film is!

"Film" is a fascinating invention that reproduces the image-capturing functionality of a digital camera's sensor using a chemical emulsion which is applied to a transparent, flexible substrate.

This is what the "fox" looks like, when encased within a film canister and with an antenna attached: