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Wish you all luck & Safety

carl.wf6j@gmail.com
 

See that PG&E is cutting power to an awful lot of folks again.

This action is outrageous after the last big fire when power was off, but it was PG&E’s high tension line that started the fire.

de WF6J

Greg D
 

Hi Carl,

What are you suggesting they do?

Not to defend PG&E's history, but they did note that the surveys
performed as part of the process of turning power back on after these
events did discover a number (half dozen-ish) places where wind-caused
damage could have easily sparked yet more fires. That they didn't turn
off the line that sparked the fire in Sonoma was a problem; turning off
even fewer lines, given the state of things, isn't the solution.

Greg KO6TH


carl.wf6j@... wrote:

See that PG&E is cutting power to an awful lot of folks again.

This action is outrageous after the last big fire when power was off, but it was PG&E’s high tension line that started the fire.

de WF6J

Alan Thompson
 

It is a conundrum. PG&E is trying to prevent more fires but they're also trying to keep the power shutdowns from disrupting everyone.

In 2018, only 50 KV lines and lower were included in PG&E's PSPS shutdown plan. The Camp Fire started under 115 KV lines. In 2019, my understanding is that PG&E raised its PSPS cutoff to 150 KV lines and lower. The Kincade fire apparently started under 230 KV lines. If PG&E starts shutting down 230 KV transmission lines, that will also shut off power to a vast swath of people well outside the danger zone. 
 
We have 12KV uninsulated power lines passing through our property and very near our house. PG&E comes out every year or two to clear the tree limbs near the wires. Nonetheless, if there was even the remotest chance those lines could start a fire here, we could be toast (literally). I'd just as soon they shut them off anytime they want. I've got my backup Gennie wired into our load center through a transfer switch, and we're busy installing solar panels - something I've wanted to do for a long time anyway.