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PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Brian Gohl - AI6US
 
Edited

  http://nyti.ms/2JpHZIG     
You can also sew a HEPPA filter material inside the mask, (I think you can get them at Home Depot), or attach  a Female Sanitary panty shield inside, to prevent liquid from entering you nose and mouth. By removing the shield, its machine washable. 

Enjoy folks, jim KQ6VP

Rob Newburn
 
Edited

My wife made some yesterday. After testing/fitting, this modification worked well to keep it tight fitting on the top around the nose. (See pic) 

Also, wifey said the nail salon ladies just put a folded tissue inside theirs.

Lastly, the female jail inmates are making masks. Apparently, you just pull up in front and a deputy will bring one out to you. Go for broke road in Roseville (justice center).

Stay safe and ham it up,
Rob KM6YKX


Jef - N5JEF
 

Thanks for sharing these Rob.  Inspiring to hear about some of the range of responses to our shared situation.

- Jef  

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 8:19 AM Rob Newburn <robnewburn@...> wrote:
My wife made some yesterday. After testing/fitting, this modification worked well to keep it tight fitting on the top around the nose. (See pic) 

Also, wifey said the nail salon ladies just put a folded tissue inside theirs.

Lastly, the female jail inmates are making masks. Apparently, you just pull up in front and a deputy will bring one out to you. Go for broke road in Roseville (justice center).

Stay safe and ham it up,
Rob KM6YKX


Jim - N6MED
 

Gentlemen, thanks for sharing all.  There is a lot of info and videos "out there" re rolling your own. Folks seem to be paying more attention to mask construction and little to proper donning and doffing. With all the video in the media of folks wearing masks, from Asians on the street in the home countries to even docs in a US ER, it's very apparent (to this retired professional, at least), that folks aren't wearing masks correctly.
Proper fit is equally as important as constructing an effective mask, for, if you don't put it on properly all your construction efforts will be for naught.

When "donning" (putting on) a mask, regardless if it has ear loops or a pair of ties, the malleable strip of metal at your nose must be formed across your nose bridge using two fingers to form it on both sides of your nose.Do NOT pinch the metal piece between your thumb and forefinger to form it else a gap will be formed with a resulting air leak.

If the mask has ties, first secure one around your neck fitting the mask under your chin, pull upper part of the mask up over the bridge of your nose, then secure the second tie above your ears and behind your head.

Humor me: I've included a couple of video links that show proper procedure for donning and doffing "surgical" masks.

Donning and Doffing Facial Protection (mask)
Mask with ear loops:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6mjqbtonG4Mask
With ties:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWnTCZWYOBw

Blue shop towels as an an improved material over cotton for home made mask:
https://www.businessinsider.com/homemade-mask-using-hydro-knit-shop-towel-filters-better-2020-4

Caution: Do not use hepa filter (e.g., Kirby vacuum hepa filters) to make a mask:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiYbXsIcI7E
(I didn't know this and, other than what this particular MD says about hepa filters, I cannot attest to the use of fiberglass in the construction of hepa filters.)

Stay well, everyone!
Jim / N6MED

Greg D
 

Hi Jim,

Thanks for the info!  A question:

Would a simple non-M95 "dust mask" work as well as a hand-made cotton mask or scarf?  As I understand the purpose, the idea is to protect others from someone who is sick but is not yet symptomatic.  So, droplet containment on the inside is what they're after, not preventing ingress from the outside.

Greg  KO6TH


Jim - N6MED wrote:

Gentlemen, thanks for sharing all.  There is a lot of info and videos "out there" re rolling your own. Folks seem to be paying more attention to mask construction and little to proper donning and doffing. With all the video in the media of folks wearing masks, from Asians on the street in the home countries to even docs in a US ER, it's very apparent (to this retired professional, at least), that folks aren't wearing masks correctly.
Proper fit is equally as important as constructing an effective mask, for, if you don't put it on properly all your construction efforts will be for naught.

When "donning" (putting on) a mask, regardless if it has ear loops or a pair of ties, the malleable strip of metal at your nose must be formed across your nose bridge using two fingers to form it on both sides of your nose.Do NOT pinch the metal piece between your thumb and forefinger to form it else a gap will be formed with a resulting air leak.

If the mask has ties, first secure one around your neck fitting the mask under your chin, pull upper part of the mask up over the bridge of your nose, then secure the second tie above your ears and behind your head.

Humor me: I've included a couple of video links that show proper procedure for donning and doffing "surgical" masks.

Donning and Doffing Facial Protection (mask)
Mask with ear loops:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6mjqbtonG4Mask
With ties:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWnTCZWYOBw

Blue shop towels as an an improved material over cotton for home made mask:
https://www.businessinsider.com/homemade-mask-using-hydro-knit-shop-towel-filters-better-2020-4

Caution: Do not use hepa filter (e.g., Kirby vacuum hepa filters) to make a mask:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiYbXsIcI7E
(I didn't know this and, other than what this particular MD says about hepa filters, I cannot attest to the use of fiberglass in the construction of hepa filters.)

Stay well, everyone!
Jim / N6MED

Jim - N6MED
 
Edited

Greg --
You are spot on re "... protect others from someone who is sick ..."
The dust masks you find at the hardware, from what I'm able to tell when compared to similar masks available for one time use on a medical unit are w-a-y better than a cotton scarf or cotton home made mask if you are trying to protect yourself from a spit-spray cloud left hanging in the air by someone who just sneezed. Cotton seems way to porous.

But, fit is everything.

The quandry is that an infected individual would wear a mask to prevent expelling mist or droplets into his/her surroundings. A non-infected individual would wear one to prevent inhaling "large" droplets (a relative term, ref the link in my post that follows). I typically worn this type of mask to protect me when entering a patients room who had a respiratory disease (e.g., the flu). A care giver would wear an N-95 (or even an N-100) to protect against 3 micron and smaller infections particulates.

BTW: I exchanged texts with a critical care (i.e., ICU) nurse friend who works at Sutter Auburn Faith hospital. The nurses over there are in dire straits. She said "We are rationed 1 surgical mask per day (worn 24/7 except meals) and N-95 is for 1 RN per shift. No one is allowed in COVID rooms except RN, MD, or RT" (RT=respiratory therapists). If anyone has a stash of N-95s or a group can make a bunch of surgical masks (shop towel material?), maybe it could help those on the front lines over there.

One style of surgical mask. Note, that with this and similar designs, after securing the lower tie, the pleats are pulled apart as the mask is pulled up over the nose.



Stay well!!!

Greg D
 

Hi Jim,

Ok, so let me ask a little differently.  Given that I strongly do not believe that I have been exposed - been at home with only the cat for the past 3 weeks except for one outage a week ago to get cat food (did a parking lot pickup) - then should I:

a)  Wear the "dust mask", or
b)  Make a cloth-based pleated mask as shown in the NYT article (https://www.nytimes.com/article/how-to-make-face-mask-coronavirus.html)

Is either choice about the same?

Second question... 

I've not seen much by way of guidance on the use of gloves.  Presume yes.  I have a box of the blue "Nitrile" type.  Put them on when I exit the car, shop, take them off (taking care not to touch the outsides) after putting stuff in the car and dumping the cart back in its corral.  Use brown paper bags instead of the reusable plastic kind (virus life is shorter on cardboard).  Wash hands when I get home before and after I put stuff away.  Good plan?

Third question (sorry!)...  My daughter's boyfriend is offering to go shopping for me.  But I'm thinking it would be safer for me to go by myself during Safeway's "old folks hours" (Tues / Thur early morning) than for him to come up from the Lincoln area to Auburn to shop, or to shop down in Lincoln and transport the groceries up to Auburn.  I.e., best not to travel between the two areas, especially when there are specific hours at the local Auburn store dedicated to higher-risk folks.  Yes?

Thanks for the guidance,

Greg  KO6TH


Jim - N6MED wrote:

Greg --
You are spot on re "... protect others from someone who is sick ..."
The dust masks you find at the hardware, from what I'm able to tell when compared to similar masks available for one time use on a medical unit are w-a-y better than a cotton scarf or cotton home made mask if you are trying to protect yourself from a spit-spray cloud left hanging in the air by someone who just sneezed. Cotton seems way to porous.

But, fit is everything.

The quandry is that an infected individual would wear a mask to prevent expelling mist or droplets into his/her surroundings. A non-infected individual would wear one to prevent inhaling "large" droplets (a relative term, ref the link in my post that follows). I typically worn this type of mask to protect me when entering a patients room who had a respiratory disease (e.g., the flu). A care giver would wear an N-95 (or even an N-100) to protect against 3 micron and smaller infections particulates.

BTW: I exchanged texts with a critical care (i.e., ICU) nurse friend who works at Sutter Auburn Faith hospital. The nurses over there are in dire straits. She said "We are rationed 1 surgical mask per day (worn 24/7 except meals) and N-95 is for 1 RN per shift. No one is allowed in COVID rooms except RN, MD, or RT" (RT=respiratory therapists). If anyone has a stash of N-95s or a group can make a bunch of surgical masks (shop towel material?), maybe it could help those on the front lines over there.

One style of surgical mask. Note, that with this and similar designs, after securing the lower tie, the pleats are pulled apart as the mask is pulled up over the nose.



Stay well!!!

Jim - N6MED
 

Sorry if I lacked clarity in my first response.

1. The "dust mask" so far as I can tell is made of paper and less porous than the pleated cloth mask and, IN MY OPINION the better option. My wife wears the dust mask when she has ventured out to shop. A cloth mask, again, IMHO, would be better suited for one who is infected and coughing or sneezing. It's all about blocking cooties from gozinta or gozouta, whichever side of the mask you are on.

2. If one ventures out to shop, wearing gloves ("inspection" or "exam" gloves, whether nitrile, vinyl, or even latex) might be useful if you have open cuts or sores on your hands. But, simple course would be to use those wipes stores make available to wipe off the grocery cart handle/push bar. Just go for t a wipe that is still wet. After wiping, give it a few moments to dry.

Watching Dr. Sanjay Gupta, MD last eve, he brings his groceries into his house and divides his kitchen counter into  "dirty" and  "clean" halves. Ref: https://www.cnn.com/videos/health/2020/04/03/sanjay-gupta-wiping-cleaning-groceries-demo-town-hall-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/novel-coronavirus-explained/

My wife leaves all but the cold stuff in our garage for 48 hours then uses those household wipes (the ones that claim to kill 99% of cooties) on the packages before bring them inside. And, she has her shopping clothes left in the garage, changing before she comes in the house.

Else, IMHO, your plan looks good to me, especially the part about hand washing!

3. Nice offer from your daughter's boyfriend. But where have his hands been? Is he as attentive to social distancing and hygiene as you are? If my Valery wasn't going out to shop (and she is r-e-a-l-l-y careful in a store). I think using Bel Air's (and Raley's) on-line shopping and home delivery would be  a great solution. Dennis / WU6X can offer first hand experience there.

Jim / N6MED

On 4/5/2020 2:11 PM, Greg D wrote:
Hi Jim,

Ok, so let me ask a little differently.  Given that I strongly do not believe that I have been exposed - been at home with only the cat for the past 3 weeks except for one outage a week ago to get cat food (did a parking lot pickup) - then should I:

a)  Wear the "dust mask", or
b)  Make a cloth-based pleated mask as shown in the NYT article (https://www.nytimes.com/article/how-to-make-face-mask-coronavirus.html)

Is either choice about the same?

Second question... 

I've not seen much by way of guidance on the use of gloves.  Presume yes.  I have a box of the blue "Nitrile" type.  Put them on when I exit the car, shop, take them off (taking care not to touch the outsides) after putting stuff in the car and dumping the cart back in its corral.  Use brown paper bags instead of the reusable plastic kind (virus life is shorter on cardboard).  Wash hands when I get home before and after I put stuff away.  Good plan?

Third question (sorry!)...  My daughter's boyfriend is offering to go shopping for me.  But I'm thinking it would be safer for me to go by myself during Safeway's "old folks hours" (Tues / Thur early morning) than for him to come up from the Lincoln area to Auburn to shop, or to shop down in Lincoln and transport the groceries up to Auburn.  I.e., best not to travel between the two areas, especially when there are specific hours at the local Auburn store dedicated to higher-risk folks.  Yes?

Thanks for the guidance,

Greg  KO6TH