Topics

Field Day and FT8 #fieldday #digital


Gerry - WA6E
 

I'm planning to try FT8 for Field Day.  Last year the ARRL had some different frequencies for FT8 use on Field Day.  For example, for 20 meters they said to use 14.080 instead of 14.074.  Similarly they specified 28.080, 21.080, 7.080 and 3.570.  Does anybody know if those will be the FT8 frequencies for this year?

Gerry
WA6E


Orion, AI6JB
 

That is an excellent question Gerry!

The only FT8 references I could find in the Field Day planning packet (http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Field-Day/2020/2020%20Field%20Day%20Packet%20Rev%20a.pdf) are for 6m and up. Nothing said about HF.

I will pose the question to the ARRL Contest Groups.io site to see they come up with anything.

73
Orion Endres, AI6JB
1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383
(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

What the heck does “73” mean? 73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators. It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

-----Original Message-----
From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerry - WA6E
Sent: Thursday, June 04, 2020 10:51
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

I'm planning to try FT8 for Field Day. Last year the ARRL had some different frequencies for FT8 use on Field Day. For example, for 20 meters they said to use 14.080 instead of 14.074. Similarly they specified 28.080, 21.080, 7.080 and 3.570. Does anybody know if those will be the FT8 frequencies for this year?

Gerry
WA6E


Herb - KM6JBI
 

I plan on running FT8 as well


On Thu, Jun 4, 2020 at 11:39 AM Orion, AI6JB <ojendres@...> wrote:
That is an excellent question Gerry!

The only FT8 references I could find in the Field Day planning packet (http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Field-Day/2020/2020%20Field%20Day%20Packet%20Rev%20a.pdf) are for 6m and up.  Nothing said about HF.

I will pose the question to the ARRL Contest Groups.io site to see they come up with anything.

73
Orion Endres, AI6JB
1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383
(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.





-----Original Message-----
From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerry - WA6E
Sent: Thursday, June 04, 2020 10:51
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

I'm planning to try FT8 for Field Day.  Last year the ARRL had some different frequencies for FT8 use on Field Day.  For example, for 20 meters they said to use 14.080 instead of 14.074.  Similarly they specified 28.080, 21.080, 7.080 and 3.570.  Does anybody know if those will be the FT8 frequencies for this year?

Gerry
WA6E









--
Herb Garcia, KM6JBI


Gerry - WA6E
 

The suggestion comes from an article written by Joe Taylor, K1JT, appearing on pages 72 and 73 of the January 2019 QST.  He was suggesting alternative frequencies for FT8 to avoid conflict in the RTTY contest.  Given that the receiving windows are so small (2 to 3 KHz) if I use the alternative frequencies I won't hear anybody using the traditional frequencies.  I  hate to be down there all by myself.  Here is a photo of the "Suggested Frequencies" box that appears on page 72 of that article:

save image

So let us know what you find out.  Thanks.

Gerry
WA6E



On 6/4/2020 3:35 PM, Herb - KM6JBI wrote:
I plan on running FT8 as well

On Thu, Jun 4, 2020 at 11:39 AM Orion, AI6JB <ojendres@...> wrote:
That is an excellent question Gerry!

The only FT8 references I could find in the Field Day planning packet (http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Field-Day/2020/2020%20Field%20Day%20Packet%20Rev%20a.pdf) are for 6m and up.  Nothing said about HF.

I will pose the question to the ARRL Contest Groups.io site to see they come up with anything.

73
Orion Endres, AI6JB
1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383
(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.





-----Original Message-----
From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerry - WA6E
Sent: Thursday, June 04, 2020 10:51
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

I'm planning to try FT8 for Field Day.  Last year the ARRL had some different frequencies for FT8 use on Field Day.  For example, for 20 meters they said to use 14.080 instead of 14.074.  Similarly they specified 28.080, 21.080, 7.080 and 3.570.  Does anybody know if those will be the FT8 frequencies for this year?

Gerry
WA6E









--
Herb Garcia, KM6JBI


Orion, AI6JB
 

Gerry,

The only reply to my query on the ARRL Contest forum was from Bernd, KB7AK, who suggested the WW Digi Contest frequencies.  I looked it up and it turns out to be a contest by Slovenia Contest Club.  Not sure how relevant they are to ARRL's Field Day.

The May 28, 2020 ARRL Letter had an article about new FT8 overflow frequencies being added to the WSJT-X software beginning with release 2.2.0-rc3.  It also has a suggestion on what to do if the band gets too busy.

Sorry, I do not have a definitive answer to  your question.  My recommendation would be to update the WSJT-X software to the current release 2.2.1, 6/6/2020.  It will have the new overflow frequencies.  Then start calling on the frequencies already in the software.

73
Orion, AI6JB


Mike - KM7S
 

Greetings All,
I wandered over to the  FT8-Digital-Mode@groups.io group and looked for their suggestions and it seems the Article in QST (Jan 2019, pg 74) is hitting a sweet spot. Frequencies 3.590-3.600, 7.080-7.100, 14.130-14.150, 21.130-21.150 and 28.160-28.200. 


Orion, AI6JB
 

Thanks Mike!

 

It’s great to have another pair of eyes out there scouring the earth for answers to ham radio’s little questions.  😊

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: Mike - KM7S <mike@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 06:35
To: Orion Endres <ojendres@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Greetings All,
I wandered over to the  FT8-Digital-Mode@groups.io group and looked for their suggestions and it seems the Article in QST (Jan 2019, pg 74) is hitting a sweet spot. Frequencies 3.590-3.600, 7.080-7.100, 14.130-14.150, 21.130-21.150 and 28.160-28.200. 


Gerry - WA6E
 

I suspect there will be FT8 activity on all the usual FT8 frequencies.

BTW - I guess no FT8 on 30M or 17M?

Gerry
WA6E

On 6/10/2020 6:35 AM, Mike - KM7S wrote:
Greetings All,
I wandered over to the  FT8-Digital-Mode@groups.io group and looked for their suggestions and it seems the Article in QST (Jan 2019, pg 74) is hitting a sweet spot. Frequencies 3.590-3.600, 7.080-7.100, 14.130-14.150, 21.130-21.150 and 28.160-28.200. 


Orion, AI6JB
 

I am sorry Gerry, but 30m and 17m are NOT on the list of acceptable HF bands per the Field Day rules.  Please see Section 2.

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: Gerry Brentnall <gjbrent@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 07:46
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; mike@...; Orion Endres <ojendres@...>
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

I suspect there will be FT8 activity on all the usual FT8 frequencies.

BTW - I guess no FT8 on 30M or 17M?

Gerry
WA6E

On 6/10/2020 6:35 AM, Mike - KM7S wrote:

Greetings All,
I wandered over to the  FT8-Digital-Mode@groups.io group and looked for their suggestions and it seems the Article in QST (Jan 2019, pg 74) is hitting a sweet spot. Frequencies 3.590-3.600, 7.080-7.100, 14.130-14.150, 21.130-21.150 and 28.160-28.200. 

 


Orion, AI6JB
 

Someone asked me why you lock your transmit frequency on a clear frequency.  Quite frankly, I did not have a very good answer.

Here is a Facebook post on the FT8 For Field Day page that has an explanation why you should lock your transmit frequency.  Versus, transmitting on the receive frequency:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/163063787693492/?post_id=553348341998366

73
Orion, AI6JB 


Gerry - WA6E
 

When I click on the link it wants me to join the group.  What was their answer?  Can you copy and paste?

In theory it really doesn't matter whether you lock the frequency or not.  If you lock on a frequency and call CQ, because your computer decodes the whole spectrum, you will see your response no matter where it is transmitted - on your frequency or not.  So I can see a good argument for good communications by finding a clear spot and just staying there.

On the other hand, if you are transmitting on frequency A and the responding station is on frequency B, now you are tying up two portions of a limited spectrum.

I have read that one way to get through to a dx station is to move your transmitter to another frequency.  The theory is that most of the time when you call a station the program puts your transmitter on the same frequency as the station you are calling.  If there is a pileup on a rare dx station it will likely be on the frequency he is calling on and it is likely you will be drowned out.  Since he too will see the whole spectrum when receiving, you can be somewhere else and he will see you.

So this is puzzling.  Is there a "school" answer?

Gerry
WA6E




On 6/24/2020 11:40 AM, Orion, AI6JB wrote:
Someone asked me why you lock your transmit frequency on a clear frequency.  Quite frankly, I did not have a very good answer.

Here is a Facebook post on the FT8 For Field Day page that has an explanation why you should lock your transmit frequency.  Versus, transmitting on the receive frequency:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/163063787693492/?post_id=553348341998366 73
Orion, AI6JB 


Orion, AI6JB
 

Gerry,

Below is the cut and paste.  Hope this makes sense.

73
Orion, AI6JB

Whether you are new or a seasoned operator in FT modes it is always a good idea to lock your TX freq. Do not TX on the same freq of the station you are answering. I say this because if you forget and start calling CQ or answer someone you cause interference to the original station on that freq in the waterfall. Lock your TX, find an open hole on the waterfall and go for it.
1515
22 Comments
 
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Comments

 
 
  •  
    I do lock my frequency but surely the other station is txing on the opposite time slot to me, so why would my tx interfere with the original station?
    2
     
    • Like
    •  · 20h
    •  
      Rob Haddow because then if someone response to you and did not lock the transmit frequency they are now transmitting on that opposite time
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 11h
    •  
      Issue starts when he is still tx opposite you and if a weaker station tries to answer you on your tx freq, you may not hear him as the other station has occupied the opposite time slot.
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 11h
    •  
      Rob Haddow yours wouldn't but yours may interfere with some else trying to answer him there also.
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 8h
      •  · 
        Edited
    •  
       
      Ahh yes, good point that if a new station responding to me moves to my frequency they would now be on the same frequency and time slot as my previous QSO. Thanks all above. Going to be tricky to find a quiet slot during FD!
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 6h
     
  •  
    Once you're done, you can start calling CQ on either timeslot, and if you happen to still be on his frequency you'd step on him.
    1
     
    • Like
    •  · 20h
    •  
      Only if you change the Tx even/1st check box. If you don't change it, you will still be on the opposite time slot.
      2
       
      • Like
      •  · 17h
    •  
      Kim Gross I often will start my TX on the odd slot. After I run for a few minutes, I will switch to even slot to get stations that were TX on the same slot I was on.
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 11h
    •  
      Robert Tomkovich I listen for a few cycles when I do that, make sure there isn't someone hanging in the weeds trying to call me, or someone transmitting on my frequency. Then I find an open spot and switch time slots and start calling CQ again. I've heard that called a "Crazy Ivan" from "hunt the red october".
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 8h
      •  · 
        Edited
    •  
      Robert Tomkovich Just make sure when you make that switch, you check to see if the new time slot is clear. If you just switch time slots without looking at your waterfall, you can end up right on top of somebody.
      1
       
      • Like
      •  · 7h
    •  
       
      Kim Gross The way I work it is my TX is locked. After each QSO i log, I reset my RX to my TX freq (simplex) this way I'm listening to the same freq I'm TXing on. I can then switch to even or odd, I usually take about 1 or 2 cycle break between the switch.
      • Like
      •  · 5h
    •  
       
      You are actually listening on all the waterfall, not just where your RX window is. The only thing that gives you is priority on the list.
      • Like
      •  · 4h
    •  
       
      Kim Gross Yes I know, the left window listens to the whole bandwidth. The right only prints where my RX marker is sitting. If I set the RX to the TX then only signals where the RX marker is will print on the right unless someone call on a different waterfall spot, my RX marker will move there and print on the right side.
      • Like
      •  · 4h
     
  •  
    badge icon
    If you don't step directly on him, you might step on a weak signal trying to answer him.
    5
     
    • Like
    •  · 20h
     
  •  
    There are a lot of strategies around this. Sometimes when I'm having a QSO and he loses me, I will frequency hop to what I think might be a clear frequency. Sometimes I hop right to his, on the theory that people shouldn't be on that slot. I make sure I left before calling anyone else.
    One time I heard a rare DX, and I could tell he didn't have "lock TX" on because and he kept moving to the frequency he was answering. He had a pileup, none of which were getting through because they were on his frequency. I got him by operating split, but I knew he would change frequency to mine, and his pileup would follow and obliterate me, so I kept hopping. Got the QSO finished without getting interfered with.
    My point is, you have to be ready to be nimble when the waterfall is crowded.
    2
     
    • Like
    •  · 19h
    •  · 
      Edited
     
  •  
    badge icon
    And then the next station you call is on top of you back to the original problem. So it really doesn't matter.
    Also you can decode multiple signals on top of each other usually.
    Best luck I have had is randomly jumping around every couple minutes.
    2
     
    • Like
    •  · 18h
    •  · 
      Edited
     
  •  
    Yup- Heddy Lamar had the right idea- frequency hopping!
    1
     
    • Like
    •  · 18h
     
  •  
    That is sometimes good and sometimes problematic. You might pick a frequency that already has someone on it but is outside your ground wave reception, but the DX station is is seeing you AND another station on the same frequency.
    1
     
    • Like
    •  · 14h
     
  •  
    Some of the bands are so full here that it impossible to find your own frequently which means you are forced to call a station on their frequency or not at all.
    2
     
    • Like
    •  · 13h
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      Sometimes you wish you could turn your signal sideways to cram it in.
      3
       
      • Like
      •  · 8h
     
  •  
    I totally agree with you Robert.
    K3NXH
    1
     
    • Like
    •  · 9h
     
  •  
     
    Good discussion and lots of practical ideas. Thanks for not burning me! Hope to catch you all on FD de VE3RXH.
    • Like
    •  · 6h
     
 
 
Robert Tomkovich turned off commenting for this post.


Carl - N6CKV
 

A good YouTube video on FT8 at Field Day

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvfZtE8w1qY


Gerry - WA6E
 

Thanks, Carl.

Of interest to me is she suggests we check the "hold tx freq" box as a "courtesy" to other users.  She says this in a manner that suggests that even the most novice FT8 user would know to check this box.  I fail to see how this helps anybody or is a courtesy.  Any thoughts?

Gerry
WA6E



On 6/25/2020 12:09 PM, Carl - N6CKV wrote:
A good YouTube video on FT8 at Field Day

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvfZtE8w1qY


Carl - N6CKV
 

Gery

From the help file
Check the box Hold Tx Freq to ensure that the specified Tx frequency is not changed automatically when you double-click on decoded text or a signal in the waterfall.

I am not sure but I think it keeps you from "grabbing" the other station's frequency if you chose to tx your own CQ

carl
N6CKV


Orion, AI6JB
 

Carl & Gerry,

 

I am very confused as well, so a spent some time drawing bubbles and lines to figure this out.  Does this make sense …

 

Gerry if you call CQ and I am the only other person in the world, we can both TX and RX on the same frequency.  That works because for the first 15 sec you are TX’ing and the next 15 sec I am TX’ing.

 

The problem comes when you call CQ and Carl, with his mega station, also responds.  Since we are both on the same frequency he will either over-power me or we will interfere with each other and you would decode nothing or I will over-power him.

 

Now, if we all transmit on different frequencies, Carl transmits on a frequency other than yours, and I transmit on a frequency other his and yours, you will be able to see both of us.  Your band activity window will change color showing both of us responding.  You will be able to pick the better of us two, Carl, by double clicking on his call.  Your RX Frequency window will then lock on to Carl’s TX frequency the exchange will continue.  I will see you chose him on the next cycle in my band activity window which is a hint to move on.

 

If you had picked me instead, my RX Frequency window is locked on to your TX frequency and the software will automatically give the response immediately on the next cycle.

 

In a nutshell, if we all TX and RX on the same frequency, it will be slug fest to get your attention.  The stronger station will prevail or no one will win.  Does that make sense?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carl - N6CKV
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 13:00
To: Gerry Brentnall <gjbrent@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Gery

From the help file
Check the box Hold Tx Freq to ensure that the specified Tx frequency is not changed automatically when you double-click on decoded text or a signal in the waterfall.

I am not sure but I think it keeps you from "grabbing" the other station's frequency if you chose to tx your own CQ

carl
N6CKV


Dennis - WU6X
 

Hmmmmm ... I don't seem to have any of these problems working CW. Hi!

73,
Dennis, WU6X
1C SV


From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> on behalf of Orion, AI6JB <ojendres@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 1:30 PM
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8
 

Carl & Gerry,

 

I am very confused as well, so a spent some time drawing bubbles and lines to figure this out.  Does this make sense …

 

Gerry if you call CQ and I am the only other person in the world, we can both TX and RX on the same frequency.  That works because for the first 15 sec you are TX’ing and the next 15 sec I am TX’ing.

 

The problem comes when you call CQ and Carl, with his mega station, also responds.  Since we are both on the same frequency he will either over-power me or we will interfere with each other and you would decode nothing or I will over-power him.

 

Now, if we all transmit on different frequencies, Carl transmits on a frequency other than yours, and I transmit on a frequency other his and yours, you will be able to see both of us.  Your band activity window will change color showing both of us responding.  You will be able to pick the better of us two, Carl, by double clicking on his call.  Your RX Frequency window will then lock on to Carl’s TX frequency the exchange will continue.  I will see you chose him on the next cycle in my band activity window which is a hint to move on.

 

If you had picked me instead, my RX Frequency window is locked on to your TX frequency and the software will automatically give the response immediately on the next cycle.

 

In a nutshell, if we all TX and RX on the same frequency, it will be slug fest to get your attention.  The stronger station will prevail or no one will win.  Does that make sense?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carl - N6CKV
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 13:00
To: Gerry Brentnall <gjbrent@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Gery

From the help file
Check the box Hold Tx Freq to ensure that the specified Tx frequency is not changed automatically when you double-click on decoded text or a signal in the waterfall.

I am not sure but I think it keeps you from "grabbing" the other station's frequency if you chose to tx your own CQ

carl
N6CKV


--
Dennis - WU6X


Greg D
 

Hi Orion,

Now, that makes a lot of sense.  Adding, since this is SSB, not FM, the capture effect which traditional AFSK packet radio depends on, doesn't apply.  What I don't know is how well JT's algorithms handle multiple colliding signals. 

So, if you're hunting and pouncing, check the box to stay put.  If you're calling CQ, then by your logic you should uncheck the box so that when the person responds, your Tx will move to their frequency, which is presumably a nice quiet spot for them, so they'd be more likely to hear you?

Greg  KO6TH


Orion, AI6JB wrote:

Carl & Gerry,

 

I am very confused as well, so a spent some time drawing bubbles and lines to figure this out.  Does this make sense …

 

Gerry if you call CQ and I am the only other person in the world, we can both TX and RX on the same frequency.  That works because for the first 15 sec you are TX’ing and the next 15 sec I am TX’ing.

 

The problem comes when you call CQ and Carl, with his mega station, also responds.  Since we are both on the same frequency he will either over-power me or we will interfere with each other and you would decode nothing or I will over-power him.

 

Now, if we all transmit on different frequencies, Carl transmits on a frequency other than yours, and I transmit on a frequency other his and yours, you will be able to see both of us.  Your band activity window will change color showing both of us responding.  You will be able to pick the better of us two, Carl, by double clicking on his call.  Your RX Frequency window will then lock on to Carl’s TX frequency the exchange will continue.  I will see you chose him on the next cycle in my band activity window which is a hint to move on.

 

If you had picked me instead, my RX Frequency window is locked on to your TX frequency and the software will automatically give the response immediately on the next cycle.

 

In a nutshell, if we all TX and RX on the same frequency, it will be slug fest to get your attention.  The stronger station will prevail or no one will win.  Does that make sense?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carl - N6CKV
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 13:00
To: Gerry Brentnall <gjbrent@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Gery

From the help file
Check the box Hold Tx Freq to ensure that the specified Tx frequency is not changed automatically when you double-click on decoded text or a signal in the waterfall.

I am not sure but I think it keeps you from "grabbing" the other station's frequency if you chose to tx your own CQ

carl
N6CKV



Orion, AI6JB
 

Greg,

 

That works, except if you return to calling CQ.  Now you are on the S&P’s frequency.  You are potentially going to interfere with them. 

 

Remember, the S&P station is searching for ANY station and is NOT limiting themselves to the even or odd cycle.  Therefore, if you TX on their TX frequency and they choose to respond to a station that uses the other cycle time, you will be interfering with them.

 

I think the advise still stands, lock your transmit frequency whether or not you are Running or S&P.

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

P.S.  For those who do not know the terms Running and S&P: “Running” means calling CQ, and “S&P” means Search and Pounce.

 

 

From: Greg D <ko6th.greg@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 14:04
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; ojendres@...
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Hi Orion,

Now, that makes a lot of sense.  Adding, since this is SSB, not FM, the capture effect which traditional AFSK packet radio depends on, doesn't apply.  What I don't know is how well JT's algorithms handle multiple colliding signals. 

So, if you're hunting and pouncing, check the box to stay put.  If you're calling CQ, then by your logic you should uncheck the box so that when the person responds, your Tx will move to their frequency, which is presumably a nice quiet spot for them, so they'd be more likely to hear you?

Greg  KO6TH

Orion, AI6JB wrote:

Carl & Gerry,

 

I am very confused as well, so a spent some time drawing bubbles and lines to figure this out.  Does this make sense …

 

Gerry if you call CQ and I am the only other person in the world, we can both TX and RX on the same frequency.  That works because for the first 15 sec you are TX’ing and the next 15 sec I am TX’ing.

 

The problem comes when you call CQ and Carl, with his mega station, also responds.  Since we are both on the same frequency he will either over-power me or we will interfere with each other and you would decode nothing or I will over-power him.

 

Now, if we all transmit on different frequencies, Carl transmits on a frequency other than yours, and I transmit on a frequency other his and yours, you will be able to see both of us.  Your band activity window will change color showing both of us responding.  You will be able to pick the better of us two, Carl, by double clicking on his call.  Your RX Frequency window will then lock on to Carl’s TX frequency the exchange will continue.  I will see you chose him on the next cycle in my band activity window which is a hint to move on.

 

If you had picked me instead, my RX Frequency window is locked on to your TX frequency and the software will automatically give the response immediately on the next cycle.

 

In a nutshell, if we all TX and RX on the same frequency, it will be slug fest to get your attention.  The stronger station will prevail or no one will win.  Does that make sense?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carl - N6CKV
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 13:00
To: Gerry Brentnall <gjbrent@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Gery

From the help file
Check the box Hold Tx Freq to ensure that the specified Tx frequency is not changed automatically when you double-click on decoded text or a signal in the waterfall.

I am not sure but I think it keeps you from "grabbing" the other station's frequency if you chose to tx your own CQ

carl
N6CKV

 


Greg D
 

Ah, good point.  Un-checked it is.

Greg  KO6TH


Orion, AI6JB wrote:

Greg,

 

That works, except if you return to calling CQ.  Now you are on the S&P’s frequency.  You are potentially going to interfere with them. 

 

Remember, the S&P station is searching for ANY station and is NOT limiting themselves to the even or odd cycle.  Therefore, if you TX on their TX frequency and they choose to respond to a station that uses the other cycle time, you will be interfering with them.

 

I think the advise still stands, lock your transmit frequency whether or not you are Running or S&P.

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

P.S.  For those who do not know the terms Running and S&P: “Running” means calling CQ, and “S&P” means Search and Pounce.

 

 

From: Greg D <ko6th.greg@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 14:04
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; ojendres@...
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Hi Orion,

Now, that makes a lot of sense.  Adding, since this is SSB, not FM, the capture effect which traditional AFSK packet radio depends on, doesn't apply.  What I don't know is how well JT's algorithms handle multiple colliding signals. 

So, if you're hunting and pouncing, check the box to stay put.  If you're calling CQ, then by your logic you should uncheck the box so that when the person responds, your Tx will move to their frequency, which is presumably a nice quiet spot for them, so they'd be more likely to hear you?

Greg  KO6TH

Orion, AI6JB wrote:

Carl & Gerry,

 

I am very confused as well, so a spent some time drawing bubbles and lines to figure this out.  Does this make sense …

 

Gerry if you call CQ and I am the only other person in the world, we can both TX and RX on the same frequency.  That works because for the first 15 sec you are TX’ing and the next 15 sec I am TX’ing.

 

The problem comes when you call CQ and Carl, with his mega station, also responds.  Since we are both on the same frequency he will either over-power me or we will interfere with each other and you would decode nothing or I will over-power him.

 

Now, if we all transmit on different frequencies, Carl transmits on a frequency other than yours, and I transmit on a frequency other his and yours, you will be able to see both of us.  Your band activity window will change color showing both of us responding.  You will be able to pick the better of us two, Carl, by double clicking on his call.  Your RX Frequency window will then lock on to Carl’s TX frequency the exchange will continue.  I will see you chose him on the next cycle in my band activity window which is a hint to move on.

 

If you had picked me instead, my RX Frequency window is locked on to your TX frequency and the software will automatically give the response immediately on the next cycle.

 

In a nutshell, if we all TX and RX on the same frequency, it will be slug fest to get your attention.  The stronger station will prevail or no one will win.  Does that make sense?

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carl - N6CKV
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2020 13:00
To: Gerry Brentnall <gjbrent@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day and FT8

 

Gery

From the help file
Check the box Hold Tx Freq to ensure that the specified Tx frequency is not changed automatically when you double-click on decoded text or a signal in the waterfall.

I am not sure but I think it keeps you from "grabbing" the other station's frequency if you chose to tx your own CQ

carl
N6CKV