Topics

Colder weather / high country op’s


Ken Crouse
 

W6EK group: with colder weather approaching, thought I’d share this idea encountered over the weekend. I was working at a high country WinLink station up the hill from Logan, UT - around 8,400 ft elevation and pretty exposed (42.007279, -111.488889) pretty windy and cold enough for multiple layers and long-johns. Rather than standard sides for the canopy, the operator used 6-foot-tall Harbor Freight moving blankets as the sides. Very heavy duty: 72” x 80” blankets weighing about 5.5 lbs each. He then used tarp clips (also a Harbor Freight item) to secure the moving blankets together thereby creating a pretty solid wall. Bungee cords with balls (an item from Amazon) were used to hang the blankets from the frame of the canopy. In previous years the aid station has experienced rain / snow so they used 3/4” plywood for flooring. This combination worked quite well as the blankets really stopped the wind and provided enough insulation that it was noticeably warmer inside the canopy than just a few feet away. Anyway, just a couple of station accessories that may help winter op’s be a little more comfortable. 73, Ken K6KEC


Jef - N5JEF
 

Ken -

I like your thinking on this, but wondering what happens if these blankets get wet?

- Jef 

On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 5:25 AM Ken Crouse <ken.crouse@...> wrote:
W6EK group: with colder weather approaching, thought I’d share this idea encountered over the weekend. I was working at a high country WinLink station up the hill from Logan, UT - around 8,400 ft elevation and pretty exposed (42.007279, -111.488889) pretty windy and cold enough for multiple layers and long-johns. Rather than standard sides for the canopy, the operator used 6-foot-tall Harbor Freight moving blankets as the sides. Very heavy duty: 72” x 80” blankets weighing about 5.5 lbs each. He then used tarp clips (also a Harbor Freight item) to secure the moving blankets together thereby creating a pretty solid wall.  Bungee cords with balls (an item from Amazon) were used to hang the blankets from the frame of the canopy.  In previous years the aid station has experienced rain / snow so they used 3/4” plywood for flooring.  This combination worked quite well as the blankets really stopped the wind and provided enough insulation that it was noticeably warmer inside the canopy than just a few feet away.   Anyway, just a couple of station accessories that may help winter op’s be a little more comfortable.  73, Ken K6KEC






Ken Crouse
 

I was thinking about that as well - one idea may be to add standard exterior sides as an additional outside layer to limit how wet the blankets would get.  I'll check with the ham who set this up and see what his plan was should it have rained.  The station was up for 18+ hours (it was the final aid station of a 36-hour / 100-mile event) and the ham who organized the location has more than a dozen  years of experience at the event so has encountered inclement conditions up there before...

On Monday, September 28, 2020, 5:37:56 AM PDT, Jef Allbright <jef@...> wrote:


Ken -

I like your thinking on this, but wondering what happens if these blankets get wet?

- Jef 

On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 5:25 AM Ken Crouse <ken.crouse@...> wrote:
W6EK group: with colder weather approaching, thought I’d share this idea encountered over the weekend. I was working at a high country WinLink station up the hill from Logan, UT - around 8,400 ft elevation and pretty exposed (42.007279, -111.488889) pretty windy and cold enough for multiple layers and long-johns. Rather than standard sides for the canopy, the operator used 6-foot-tall Harbor Freight moving blankets as the sides. Very heavy duty: 72” x 80” blankets weighing about 5.5 lbs each. He then used tarp clips (also a Harbor Freight item) to secure the moving blankets together thereby creating a pretty solid wall.  Bungee cords with balls (an item from Amazon) were used to hang the blankets from the frame of the canopy.  In previous years the aid station has experienced rain / snow so they used 3/4” plywood for flooring.  This combination worked quite well as the blankets really stopped the wind and provided enough insulation that it was noticeably warmer inside the canopy than just a few feet away.   Anyway, just a couple of station accessories that may help winter op’s be a little more comfortable.  73, Ken K6KEC