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New FAA Regulations Require Towers under 200′ to be Marked

Dennis - WU6X
 

JULY 8, 2019 BY GENERAL AVIATION NEWS STAFF 14 COMMENTS

New FAA regulations require landowners to mark any towers between 50′ and 200′ on their property, as well as include the towers in a new database the FAA is developing. Previously, towers under 200′ were not subject to any federal marking requirements, according to officials with the National Agricultural Aviation AssociationAssociation officials note that since 2008 there have been 22 tower-related agricultural aircraft accidents resulting in nine fatalities. The number of accidents and fatalities is even higher when other low-level operations, such as EMS-Medevac operations, are included.

The new requirements are due to provisions in the FAA Extension, Safety and Security Act of 2016 and the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

Under the provisions in these laws, meteorological evaluation towers (METs) meeting the requirements stipulated in the bills must be both marked and logged in to the FAA database. Communication towers of the same size have the option to be either be marked or logged in the FAA database.

The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 requires this database to be functional by October 2019. The FAA is also finalizing the marking requirements for these towers, but they are expected to be similar to the standards found in FAA Advisory Circular 70/7460-1L.

Officials with the National Agricultural Aviation Association encourage landowners to preemptively mark their towers and voluntarily log towers on their property into the FAA’s Daily Digital Obstacle File(Daily DOF). The Daily DOF is an obstacle database that contains mostly obstructions above 200′, with obstructions below 200′ submitted on a voluntary basis

Brian Gohl - AI6US
 

This might be a great way to approach the repeater site tower replacement / upgrade. 

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Best Regards!
Brian Gohl - AI6US
(916) 770-7751


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On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:01:14 -0700, Dennis - WU6X <wu6x@...> wrote:

JULY 8, 2019 BY GENERAL AVIATION NEWS STAFF 14 COMMENTS

New FAA regulations require landowners to mark any towers between 50′ and 200′ on their property, as well as include the towers in a new database the FAA is developing. Previously, towers under 200′ were not subject to any federal marking requirements, according to officials with the National Agricultural Aviation AssociationAssociation officials note that since 2008 there have been 22 tower-related agricultural aircraft accidents resulting in nine fatalities. The number of accidents and fatalities is even higher when other low-level operations, such as EMS-Medevac operations, are included.

The new requirements are due to provisions in the FAA Extension, Safety and Security Act of 2016 and the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

Under the provisions in these laws, meteorological evaluation towers (METs) meeting the requirements stipulated in the bills must be both marked and logged in to the FAA database. Communication towers of the same size have the option to be either be marked or logged in the FAA database.

The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 requires this database to be functional by October 2019. The FAA is also finalizing the marking requirements for these towers, but they are expected to be similar to the standards found in FAA Advisory Circular 70/7460-1L.

Officials with the National Agricultural Aviation Association encourage landowners to preemptively mark their towers and voluntarily log towers on their property into the FAA’s Daily Digital Obstacle File(Daily DOF). The Daily DOF is an obstacle database that contains mostly obstructions above 200′, with obstructions below 200′ submitted on a voluntary basis




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Brian- AI6US

Ken Crouse
 

Wow - coming from the site development industry, there is going to be a lot of push back from both the tower industry and local jurisdictions with planning authority over these facilities. 

Ken Crouse
 

Perhaps not as big a deal as the headline might suggest:

http://www.arrl.org/faa-tower-regulation-issues

There's a nice slide-deck linked within the above ARRL article on the subject.

Ken

Dennis - WU6X
 

Yes, like most things in the news today, the "hype" comes first, then the "bits" that would have been nice to know up front. :-) I'm sorry if I got everyone with a tower worried for a split second there ... I think this will relate more to agricultural areas where a danger to aeronautical planting/dusting is common.
Dennis, WU6X