Date   

more on grounding

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Here's an article from Steve, WB2WIK on "grounding"

http://www.eham.net/articles/21383

Though I'd toss that into the pool

Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


Field Day Urban Legends, Myths and FAQs

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Hello all,

THis is an interesting website that has some good advice regarding FIeld Day Ops:
http://www.johnhuggins.com/gpl_projects/field_day_organizer/fielddayfaq.html

Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


Re: Portable Telescoping Masts

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Nice.  I have alway wanted one of these:  http://www.arraysolutions.com/Products/bigbertha.htm

Have seen 2 in the flesh (sort of speaking) impressive... no guy wires!


On Jun 16, 2012, at 6:50 AM, gregoryd99 wrote:

 

You want portable masts, I'll give you portable masts ...
http://www.floatograph.com/



Fuel Cell for Field Day?

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Hello all,

Bob, WB6VYH asked me if I remembered who said they could supply a fuel cell for Field Day.

ANyone know?

Thanks,

Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


Re: Portable Telescoping Masts

Bob Naylor <wotbob01@...>
 

Dennis, How cool that is! Hope to see you later this morning at Dick's.
73, Bob


--- On Sat, 6/16/12, gregoryd99 wrote:

From: gregoryd99
Subject: [W6EK] Portable Telescoping Masts
To: W6EK@...
Date: Saturday, June 16, 2012, 6:48 AM

You want portable masts, I'll give you portable masks ... http://www.floatograph.com/




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Portable Telescoping Masts

Dennis - WU6X
 

You want portable masts, I'll give you portable masts ...
http://www.floatograph.com/


Re: To ground or not to ground... that is my question

Bob Naylor <wotbob01@...>
 

Dave, Sure can't argue with that. Guess we should try.


--- On Fri, 6/15/12, Dave Albright wrote:

From: Dave Albright <no6no@...>
Subject: Re: [W6EK] To ground or not to ground... that is my question
To: W6EK@...
Date: Friday, June 15, 2012, 8:39 PM



On 6/15/2012 7:02 PM, wf6j wrote:
 

Hello everyone,

At Field Day last year, I did not notice anyone using a ground.

When I've been on other Field Days, we usually tried to pound in a
grounding rod and connect the station chassis to it.

Questions:
- is this really necessary?
- would this reduce station to station interference?

...discussion please

73,
Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...

grounds should always be used.  It is one of the best things you can do to reduce interference. Field day should be no different.
Grounding in RF Environments
By William D. Chesney, N8SA
Director of Communication
Michigan Wing, CAP
Dec. 2003





Proper grounding of radio stations is probably one of the least understood aspects of  ham radio.  It almost has a certain aura of mystique or magic about it instead of being the pure science it should be. This is a very important aspect of any radio installation. There are two major criteria we need to consider when doing the planning for this installation. The primary reason has to be safety, both for ourselves as the operator who will be seated at the controls, but also for our equipment and possibly the structure....probably our home. The second of course has to do with the performance of our antenna system and it's ability to radiate an efficient signal. Let's treat these separately for now and they will combine into a total plan at the end.

Surge (or Safety) grounding.
We need to protect our installation and ourselves from lightning.
There is no protection against a direct lightning hit!
It has way more power than we can shunt to ground safely or our budget can handle.  That is what insurance is for.  We CAN however make our installation an unattractive target to lightning.  We can also take care of any secondary surges and static build up that can destroy equipment and give healthy zaps enough to more than get your attention.  There is nothing more frustrating than trying to talk on a radio and you keep getting zapped on the chin while doing so!  I speak of personal experience here.  Let's let it go at that.  The Safety ground has to consist of enough ground contact surface area to safely dissipate the surges into the soil safely.  Multiple ground rods connected with solid 1 ott ground wire is best.  You should have one rod where your antenna support structure is whether it be a tower or mast or roof tripod, etc.  It must have at least 4 gauge bare or insulated, NOT stranded wire.  These surges can easily be hundreds of amps.  DO NOT scrimp on the wire.  This is your life you are dealing with.  If stranded wire is used it should be no more than 8 conductors.  Heavy bolt type connectors should be used for all connections.  You should also employ a non corrosive type coating.  All of these connectors and grease are available at your good home supplies or electrical supply houses.  All grounds for the installation should be bonded together at the ground.  NEVER daisy chain grounds.  ALL connections from devices should go DIRECTLY to closest ground point.  Use eight foot copper ground rods for all.  Bond the rods with single ott solid bare copper wire.  Drive a ground rod for electrical supply to house if you do not already have one.  Bond it to others with aforementioned wire.  If you have overhead service to house, run wire direct to neutral wire at feed point and use split bolt connections with grease for corrosion.  If you have underground service, ground at meter box.  If your power company objects, run it to your service panel.  You need a minimum of one eight foot ground rod for every protected structure, ie, every mast, tripod, vertical antenna, etc.  These must all be connected together AT THE GROUND.  Run bare copper between the separate ground rods to form a ground system.  The bare copper provides additional surface contact area for the ground system.  It should be underground, but does not need to be deep for any engineering reasons.  Make sure you make yourself a map of the runs for future projects to avoid hitting and digging up the system in the future.  Use heavy duty bolted connectors designed for this service.  If you have access to a ground megger or ground tester the system should be less than 15 ohms.  In sandy soil this can take several rods to achieve.  I have had to put down 3, 32 foot rods (consisting of four 8 foot rods with couplers and driven in with a power driver) in sand to get the measurement needed.  This should take care of our safety grounds.

RF Grounding.
Rf grounding is considerably different than surge grounding.  First thing is you are working with RF.  Since it is an AC signal it has impedance.  The length of the ground runs has much more to do with the fraction of a wavelength at the frequency involved than the DC resistance of the wire.  While the DC resistance of a ground wire may be only a fraction of an ohm, the impedance (or the AC resistance at RF frequency) can easily be hundreds or thousands of ohms on the same wire.  This can make it pretty difficult to get an effective RF ground.  Remember an RF ground wire is just a short antenna!  We want to make it as  LOUSY an antenna as possible!  We really don't need it radiating extra RF inside our shack.  It is supposed to remove this stuff not cause it.  An effective RF ground needs to be less than a quarter wave length at the highest frequency used.  As you can see there is no such thing as an effective ground for VHF or UHF.  We will concentrate our efforts to 10 meters and above.  This means our ground wire from radio to ground must be about 9 feet or less!  This is still pretty difficult.  All radios, tuners, meters, etc in radio system should be grounded in a star ground configuration.  The common point should be at the tuner if one is used, otherwise a ground bus bar can be purchased at an electrical house.  All Connections to radios should be with either insulated or bare wire with as few strands as possible.  RF likes smooth surfaces best.  DO NOT USE braid for RF connections.  This is an old wives tale!  Your ground run should go directly to the ground where you should have a ground rod for the connection point,  (which will be connected to all your other ground rods in the system as discussed above).  This run must be less than nine feet to be effective.  If you are on the second floor this will make this length impossible.  Use of a shielded ground* wire can stop radiation of the ground wire but you will still have a lousy ground.  Nothing can change this.  Ground wire tuners only turn your ground wire into a counterpoise for your antenna, meaning it WILL radiate.  This will only ensure that the low voltage point of your antenna will be at your radio.  Next we need to form our  RF counterpoise outside at our ground system.  You will next need to add some bare copper wire at the RF feedpoint where your shack ground wire connects to.  I prefer to use bare 8 gauge copper ground wire here.  It is single conductor, bare copper and easily bent and run around house.  Single strand is best but it should definitely be bare even if you have to strip insulation off wire.  Run it around the house or anywhere it will stay out of the way fo lawn equipment but not buried deeper than 1/2 inches.  This is CRITICAL.  RF will not penetrate soil deeper than this at these frequencies.   Those bonding wires you have between ground rods and ground rods do not exist to the RF!   Burying this wire under wood chips or similar non conductive landscaping, etc is the way to go.  This counterpoise should be as long as the wire antennas you have in the air.  For most hams this will be about 130 feet.  Longer is better.  I run all the way around my house.  I have found the eight gauge will push into the spacing used between driveway and foundation when persuaded with the proper tool, (READ HAMMER).  You can connect the loop back on itself at the feed point.  This can add several S units to the receive signal and dramatically reduce noise on the signal, though nothing will help all the noise on 80 or 160 meters.   Years ago I installed a long wire antenna that was about 250 feet long and about 50 feet in the air.  This should work fantastic you say.  I had three ground rods outside window of shack with single ott solid copper ground wire direct to tuner. Ground wire length was only six feet.   All three rods were spaced about eight feet apart with connecting bare wire interconnecting them....in other words, a really good surge ground.  What I did not realize at that time was how lousy my RF ground was.  We could not tune the antenna on most frequencies and we kept getting zapped from the radio or microphone when we transmitted.  Also, our signal reports were lousy.  SO, after consulting some experts, I added 250 feet of counterpoise around the building consisting of some bare 6 gauge copper wire I had.  The radio was on while I rolled it out and a friend was listening to the broadcast on 40 meters, (OK it was night time---best time to do antenna work right!)  Anyway he reported the broadcast was only about S 4-5 on meter.  As I rolled out the counterpoise it rose to 40 over S9 and came in much clearer.  We were able to tune everything easily now and SWR was rock stable.  When we did a signal test, the station we had talked to before accused us of running a contest amplifier.  We could not convince them it was only 100 watts, same as before and the same antenna! 

SUMMARY.
Don't underestimate the importance of a good ground system.
Include it into the planning of that ultimate shack you are working on.  Don't scrimp on good copper wire and connectors.  Aluminum can be used above ground but never in ground.  Add one size to aluminum to achieve same current capability.   Ground everything to the system.  A ground run to ductwork in house can alleviate a lot of noise.  A run to water pipes should go direct to ground....NEVER to radios,  NEVER connect radios to ANYTHING inside the house for ground purposes.  Always run all grounds from everything to ground directly.  In other words, your furnace ducts will get one run, your water pipes will get one, etc.  Don't daisy chain to save wire.  If you have a chain link fence in back yard, run a bonding wire underground from ground system to it and bond well.  A solid aluminum or copper wire run along bottom of fence as a bonding device will make it a great addition to the system.  Weave it through the bottom fence fabric and bond every few feet with a split bolt connector.  The power company does this with all their fences around their power stations.  

* A shielded ground can be made using RG 8 or similar coax to replace the ground wire.  Connect both inner and outer shields to the Ground rod and connect the center only to the radio.  Add a .1uf 1000 volt cap between ground and shield at this end.
73 Bill - N8SA"



quote"



Re: To ground or not to ground... that is my question

Dave Albright <no6no@...>
 

On 6/15/2012 7:02 PM, wf6j wrote:
 

Hello everyone,

At Field Day last year, I did not notice anyone using a ground.

When I've been on other Field Days, we usually tried to pound in a
grounding rod and connect the station chassis to it.

Questions:
- is this really necessary?
- would this reduce station to station interference?

...discussion please

73,
Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...

grounds should always be used.  It is one of the best things you can do to reduce interference. Field day should be no different.
Grounding in RF Environments
By William D. Chesney, N8SA
Director of Communication
Michigan Wing, CAP
Dec. 2003





Proper grounding of radio stations is probably one of the least understood aspects of  ham radio.  It almost has a certain aura of mystique or magic about it instead of being the pure science it should be. This is a very important aspect of any radio installation. There are two major criteria we need to consider when doing the planning for this installation. The primary reason has to be safety, both for ourselves as the operator who will be seated at the controls, but also for our equipment and possibly the structure....probably our home. The second of course has to do with the performance of our antenna system and it's ability to radiate an efficient signal. Let's treat these separately for now and they will combine into a total plan at the end.

Surge (or Safety) grounding.
We need to protect our installation and ourselves from lightning.
There is no protection against a direct lightning hit!
It has way more power than we can shunt to ground safely or our budget can handle.  That is what insurance is for.  We CAN however make our installation an unattractive target to lightning.  We can also take care of any secondary surges and static build up that can destroy equipment and give healthy zaps enough to more than get your attention.  There is nothing more frustrating than trying to talk on a radio and you keep getting zapped on the chin while doing so!  I speak of personal experience here.  Let's let it go at that.  The Safety ground has to consist of enough ground contact surface area to safely dissipate the surges into the soil safely.  Multiple ground rods connected with solid 1 ott ground wire is best.  You should have one rod where your antenna support structure is whether it be a tower or mast or roof tripod, etc.  It must have at least 4 gauge bare or insulated, NOT stranded wire.  These surges can easily be hundreds of amps.  DO NOT scrimp on the wire.  This is your life you are dealing with.  If stranded wire is used it should be no more than 8 conductors.  Heavy bolt type connectors should be used for all connections.  You should also employ a non corrosive type coating.  All of these connectors and grease are available at your good home supplies or electrical supply houses.  All grounds for the installation should be bonded together at the ground.  NEVER daisy chain grounds.  ALL connections from devices should go DIRECTLY to closest ground point.  Use eight foot copper ground rods for all.  Bond the rods with single ott solid bare copper wire.  Drive a ground rod for electrical supply to house if you do not already have one.  Bond it to others with aforementioned wire.  If you have overhead service to house, run wire direct to neutral wire at feed point and use split bolt connections with grease for corrosion.  If you have underground service, ground at meter box.  If your power company objects, run it to your service panel.  You need a minimum of one eight foot ground rod for every protected structure, ie, every mast, tripod, vertical antenna, etc.  These must all be connected together AT THE GROUND.  Run bare copper between the separate ground rods to form a ground system.  The bare copper provides additional surface contact area for the ground system.  It should be underground, but does not need to be deep for any engineering reasons.  Make sure you make yourself a map of the runs for future projects to avoid hitting and digging up the system in the future.  Use heavy duty bolted connectors designed for this service.  If you have access to a ground megger or ground tester the system should be less than 15 ohms.  In sandy soil this can take several rods to achieve.  I have had to put down 3, 32 foot rods (consisting of four 8 foot rods with couplers and driven in with a power driver) in sand to get the measurement needed.  This should take care of our safety grounds.

RF Grounding.
Rf grounding is considerably different than surge grounding.  First thing is you are working with RF.  Since it is an AC signal it has impedance.  The length of the ground runs has much more to do with the fraction of a wavelength at the frequency involved than the DC resistance of the wire.  While the DC resistance of a ground wire may be only a fraction of an ohm, the impedance (or the AC resistance at RF frequency) can easily be hundreds or thousands of ohms on the same wire.  This can make it pretty difficult to get an effective RF ground.  Remember an RF ground wire is just a short antenna!  We want to make it as  LOUSY an antenna as possible!  We really don't need it radiating extra RF inside our shack.  It is supposed to remove this stuff not cause it.  An effective RF ground needs to be less than a quarter wave length at the highest frequency used.  As you can see there is no such thing as an effective ground for VHF or UHF.  We will concentrate our efforts to 10 meters and above.  This means our ground wire from radio to ground must be about 9 feet or less!  This is still pretty difficult.  All radios, tuners, meters, etc in radio system should be grounded in a star ground configuration.  The common point should be at the tuner if one is used, otherwise a ground bus bar can be purchased at an electrical house.  All Connections to radios should be with either insulated or bare wire with as few strands as possible.  RF likes smooth surfaces best.  DO NOT USE braid for RF connections.  This is an old wives tale!  Your ground run should go directly to the ground where you should have a ground rod for the connection point,  (which will be connected to all your other ground rods in the system as discussed above).  This run must be less than nine feet to be effective.  If you are on the second floor this will make this length impossible.  Use of a shielded ground* wire can stop radiation of the ground wire but you will still have a lousy ground.  Nothing can change this.  Ground wire tuners only turn your ground wire into a counterpoise for your antenna, meaning it WILL radiate.  This will only ensure that the low voltage point of your antenna will be at your radio.  Next we need to form our  RF counterpoise outside at our ground system.  You will next need to add some bare copper wire at the RF feedpoint where your shack ground wire connects to.  I prefer to use bare 8 gauge copper ground wire here.  It is single conductor, bare copper and easily bent and run around house.  Single strand is best but it should definitely be bare even if you have to strip insulation off wire.  Run it around the house or anywhere it will stay out of the way fo lawn equipment but not buried deeper than 1/2 inches.  This is CRITICAL.  RF will not penetrate soil deeper than this at these frequencies.   Those bonding wires you have between ground rods and ground rods do not exist to the RF!   Burying this wire under wood chips or similar non conductive landscaping, etc is the way to go.  This counterpoise should be as long as the wire antennas you have in the air.  For most hams this will be about 130 feet.  Longer is better.  I run all the way around my house.  I have found the eight gauge will push into the spacing used between driveway and foundation when persuaded with the proper tool, (READ HAMMER).  You can connect the loop back on itself at the feed point.  This can add several S units to the receive signal and dramatically reduce noise on the signal, though nothing will help all the noise on 80 or 160 meters.   Years ago I installed a long wire antenna that was about 250 feet long and about 50 feet in the air.  This should work fantastic you say.  I had three ground rods outside window of shack with single ott solid copper ground wire direct to tuner. Ground wire length was only six feet.   All three rods were spaced about eight feet apart with connecting bare wire interconnecting them....in other words, a really good surge ground.  What I did not realize at that time was how lousy my RF ground was.  We could not tune the antenna on most frequencies and we kept getting zapped from the radio or microphone when we transmitted.  Also, our signal reports were lousy.  SO, after consulting some experts, I added 250 feet of counterpoise around the building consisting of some bare 6 gauge copper wire I had.  The radio was on while I rolled it out and a friend was listening to the broadcast on 40 meters, (OK it was night time---best time to do antenna work right!)  Anyway he reported the broadcast was only about S 4-5 on meter.  As I rolled out the counterpoise it rose to 40 over S9 and came in much clearer.  We were able to tune everything easily now and SWR was rock stable.  When we did a signal test, the station we had talked to before accused us of running a contest amplifier.  We could not convince them it was only 100 watts, same as before and the same antenna! 

SUMMARY.
Don't underestimate the importance of a good ground system.
Include it into the planning of that ultimate shack you are working on.  Don't scrimp on good copper wire and connectors.  Aluminum can be used above ground but never in ground.  Add one size to aluminum to achieve same current capability.   Ground everything to the system.  A ground run to ductwork in house can alleviate a lot of noise.  A run to water pipes should go direct to ground....NEVER to radios,  NEVER connect radios to ANYTHING inside the house for ground purposes.  Always run all grounds from everything to ground directly.  In other words, your furnace ducts will get one run, your water pipes will get one, etc.  Don't daisy chain to save wire.  If you have a chain link fence in back yard, run a bonding wire underground from ground system to it and bond well.  A solid aluminum or copper wire run along bottom of fence as a bonding device will make it a great addition to the system.  Weave it through the bottom fence fabric and bond every few feet with a split bolt connector.  The power company does this with all their fences around their power stations.  

* A shielded ground can be made using RG 8 or similar coax to replace the ground wire.  Connect both inner and outer shields to the Ground rod and connect the center only to the radio.  Add a .1uf 1000 volt cap between ground and shield at this end.
73 Bill - N8SA"



quote"


To ground or not to ground... that is my question

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Hello everyone,

At Field Day last year, I did not notice anyone using a ground.

When I've been on other Field Days, we usually tried to pound in a grounding rod and connect the station chassis to it.

Questions:
- is this really necessary?
- would this reduce station to station interference?

...discussion please

73,
Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


Field Day exact location data #fieldday

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

In case someone who wants to come up asks what the coordinates are for the SIte, here you go:

Latitude, Longitude 39.291204, -120.678635

THis is now listed on the Field Day website page under the map.

73,
Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


WS testing on 145.43 repeater Jun 16/17th

rkuepper@ymail.com <rkuepper@...>
 

There will be random testing by radio operators for Western States run on June 16 or and 17th.

Use of the repeater has also been approved for the WS run weekend of June 23.

Richard WA6RWS


Re: Looking for push up mast 4 Field Day

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Dave,

Great.  Only need 20'  can strap to my luggage rack on the Jeep ;)

WIll cet with you later. I'm fine days or evenings.

Carl


On Jun 12, 2012, at 9:51 AM, Dave Albright wrote:

 

On 6/11/2012 9:45 PM, wf6j wrote:

 

Thought I had one, but no.

Need a 2 section "push-up" TV mast for Field Day use.

Thanks,

Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...

Carl I have one 20 ft mast and 1 30 ft mast.

I am not going to be able to go to field day but we could get together somehow.

Dave NO6NO


Carl, WF6J




Re: Looking for push up mast 4 Field Day

Dave Albright <no6no@...>
 

On 6/11/2012 9:45 PM, wf6j wrote:
 

Thought I had one, but no.

Need a 2 section "push-up" TV mast for Field Day use.

Thanks,

Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...

Carl I have one 20 ft mast and 1 30 ft mast.

I am not going to be able to go to field day but we could get together somehow.

Dave NO6NO


Looking for push up mast 4 Field Day

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

Thought I had one, but no.

Need a 2 section "push-up" TV mast for Field Day use.

Thanks,

Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


Re: Local HJF Nets list

B F Costa <costab@...>
 

Caltrans Auxiliary Radio System: and followed by OES net. Wednesday at 0945 local time.  On or near this frequency to 7230.

Bill WV6J

 

From: W6EK@... [mailto:W6EK@...] On Behalf Of Bob Naylor
Sent: Monday, June 11, 2012 12:35 PM
To: W6EK@...
Subject: Re: [W6EK] Local HJF Nets list

 

 

Carl, There's a net on the Grass Valley repeater during the week in the morning. I've heard Dave, WB6RBE on there just don't remember details.

73, Bob

--- On Sun, 6/10/12, wf6j <wf6J@...> wrote:


From: wf6j <wf6J@...>
Subject: [W6EK] Local HJF Nets list
To: "W6EK Yahoo Group" <W6EK@...>
Date: Sunday, June 10, 2012, 12:12 PM




HF LOCAL NETS IN SACRAMENTO AREA by day and local time

RAMS 10 M SSB Net - 28.480 USB - Sun 8:00 PM - Sac and So Placer Cos.

NCARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.453 USB - Tue after 7:00 PM 147.285 net. - Nevada Co.

SFMARC 80 M CW Net - 3.535 CW - Tue 7:30 PM - Northern California meeting

ACARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.475 USB - Tue after 7:30 PM 146.835 net. - Amador Co.

LARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.400 USB - Wed after 7:00 PM 147.090 net. - Lodi - Vert.

RCARCS 10 M SSB Net - 28.420 USB - Wed after 8:00 PM 145.250 net. - Sac Co.

Mt Vaca 80M Sat Nite Net - 3.9185 LSB - Sat 8:00 PM - Open informal - Valley.

 

If you have any others, please emails them and they will be added to the list.


Re: Local HJF Nets list

Bob Naylor <wotbob01@...>
 

Carl, There's a net on the Grass Valley repeater during the week in the morning. I've heard Dave, WB6RBE on there just don't remember details.
73, Bob


--- On Sun, 6/10/12, wf6j wrote:

From: wf6j
Subject: [W6EK] Local HJF Nets list
To: "W6EK Yahoo Group"
Date: Sunday, June 10, 2012, 12:12 PM




HF LOCAL NETS IN SACRAMENTO AREA by day and local time

RAMS 10 M SSB Net - 28.480 USB - Sun 8:00 PM - Sac and So Placer Cos.

NCARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.453 USB - Tue after 7:00 PM 147.285 net. - Nevada Co.

SFMARC 80 M CW Net - 3.535 CW - Tue 7:30 PM - Northern California meeting

ACARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.475 USB - Tue after 7:30 PM 146.835 net. - Amador Co.

LARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.400 USB - Wed after 7:00 PM 147.090 net. - Lodi - Vert.

RCARCS 10 M SSB Net - 28.420 USB - Wed after 8:00 PM 145.250 net. - Sac Co.

Mt Vaca 80M Sat Nite Net - 3.9185 LSB - Sat 8:00 PM - Open informal - Valley.

If you have any others, please emails them and they will be added to the list.



NEW - SFARC Technician Class Course on-line

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

With a million thanks to Dave, NO6NO for developing this course and sessions, it is now available on-line from our website.

There are links on the homepage, Elmer help and VE Exams. Even if you are a seasoned ham, or new ham that just got their license, this course is well worth the time to learn more of the tech in our great hobby.

http://w6ek.org then click on the link at the top of the content section.

73,
Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


Local HJF Nets list

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 


HF LOCAL NETS IN SACRAMENTO AREA by day and local time

RAMS 10 M SSB Net - 28.480 USB - Sun 8:00 PM - Sac and So Placer Cos.

NCARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.453 USB - Tue after 7:00 PM 147.285 net. - Nevada Co.

SFMARC 80 M CW Net - 3.535 CW - Tue 7:30 PM - Northern California meeting

ACARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.475 USB - Tue after 7:30 PM 146.835 net. - Amador Co.

LARC 10 M SSB Net - 28.400 USB - Wed after 7:00 PM 147.090 net. - Lodi - Vert.

RCARCS 10 M SSB Net - 28.420 USB - Wed after 8:00 PM 145.250 net. - Sac Co.

Mt Vaca 80M Sat Nite Net - 3.9185 LSB - Sat 8:00 PM - Open informal - Valley.

If you have any others, please emails them and they will be added to the list.


Your computer security

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

In today's world there are so many schemes, SPAM and other stuff going on, it is sometimes difficult to keep up with it all.

In the past month there have been a number of new hacks that may effect you.

Google's Gmail, Yahoo (AT&T's) Ymail, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

If you have any of these accounts, go ther now and replace your password to something that is considered secure. Not your callsiogn or AUnt's name, but more like this:

1A7k3D888bQ5zz4M

THat contains Caps, lower case and numbers. It is also 16 characters in length. Not impossible to decript, but close enough to it.

It's too bad we all have to suffer because of a few -------s

73,
Carl, WF6J
wf6j@...


[pr:12136] Scouts

wf6j <wf6J@...>
 

From the pr wire...

something to think about for an event next year...

Begin forwarded message:

At Gwinnett Amateur Radio Society, GARS, we do our merit badge during JOTA.  We've had over 50 per session.  We break it down to three groups.  We also sponsor a Venture Crew "Crew 73".

Norm Schklar
Amateur Radio Station WA4ZXV
Join GARS for Field Day June 23 and 24

Carl, WF6J