Date   

New Net Control on Elmer Net (This Wednesday at 7:30)

Carl - WF6J
 

QST - After starting and trying to run the Elmer Net for years now, I reached out and asked if someone else wanted a chance and bingo .. Two good Candidates!.

Starting this Wednesday we will introduce the new net control op and also net control alternate.

So come check in and see who the new guys are, plus what fun we can all have solving problems and learning more about our great hobby.

73,
Carl, WF6J
ARRL PIO
Elmer Net Control


Re: Sunday afternoon on 20m/FT8

Gerry - WA6E
 

What a great story.  I love it when paths cross like this.  It is, indeed, a small world after all.

Gerry
WA6E

On 3/1/2021 1:43 PM, Ken - K6KEC wrote:

In the small world of ham radio have you ever had a chance encounter with someone from out of the area whose path you’ve crossed before? For me, the answer on Sunday afternoon was a remarkable, “yes!”

 

In another part of my life, I am the Secretary of the Fall of Saigon Marines Association, a California non-profit / public benefit corporation I help establish in 2000. The association is made up of Marines I served with at the American Embassy in Saigon, RVN in the spring of 1975 at the time of its evacuation. Yes, helicopters off the roof and all that.  To answer an oft asked question, no I wasn’t on the last helicopter – when I left at about 07:30 on the morning of 30 April 1975 there were still eleven Marines on the roof. They were lifted off about a half-hour later.

 

How does that relative to amateur radio? As Secretary of the association, I’ve traveled to Marshalltown, Iowa each year for most of the last two decades to present scholarships in memory of one of our Marines who died in the rocket attack the morning the evacuation began. Lance Corporal Darwin L. Judge – the Marine who was killed - was a member of the 1974 graduating class at Marshalltown High School (he was one of the final KIA’s of the Vietnam War and died about 10 months following his high school graduation).  Each year our association awards two scholarships in his memory at MHS to Eagle Scouts who are members of the local scouting programs. Darwin was an Eagle Scout prior to enlisting in the Marine Corps so we felt it right that the scholarships should go to other Eagle Scouts.

 

Over the years, I’ve stood on the stage during the high school’s awards evening and spoken of my friend, shared a few words about our shared time in Saigon and the importance of service then called the recipients of the scholarships forward to be recognized. Two of those scholarship winners were Matthew Ingram in 2008 and his brother, Joel Ingram, in 2011.  On Sunday (yesterday) I was playing around on FT8 and one of the parties responding to my CQ was AE0DI.  Like I do each time I log an FT8  QSO in QRZ, I took a quick look at the bio and noticed the operator’s QTH: Marshalltown, Iowa (its a small community of less than 30,000 cut out of rolling corn fields about an hour northeast of De Moines). Although I didn’t recognize the significance of the gentleman’s name, I did recognize Marshalltown so sent him a brief follow-up telling him I’ve actually been to Marshalltown and were friends with a local farming family. Low and behold, AE0DI is David Ingram, the father of Mathew and Joel mentioned above. 

David (AE0DI) filled me in on his sons: Matthew graduated with a BS in Athletic Training from the University of Northern Iowa and also earned a Master of Health Care Administration from Des Moines University.   Joel graduated with a BS in Athletic Training from the University of Northern Iowa and a Doctor of Physical Therapy from The University of Iowa.  Both boys are doing well.  Hopefully I'll be able to look them up next time I'm in Marshalltown - probably in 2022. 

Anyway, just a chance encounter on a Sunday afternoon playing FT8 on 20m.

73, Ken



Sunday afternoon on 20m/FT8

Ken - K6KEC
 

In the small world of ham radio have you ever had a chance encounter with someone from out of the area whose path you’ve crossed before? For me, the answer on Sunday afternoon was a remarkable, “yes!”

 

In another part of my life, I am the Secretary of the Fall of Saigon Marines Association, a California non-profit / public benefit corporation I help establish in 2000. The association is made up of Marines I served with at the American Embassy in Saigon, RVN in the spring of 1975 at the time of its evacuation. Yes, helicopters off the roof and all that.  To answer an oft asked question, no I wasn’t on the last helicopter – when I left at about 07:30 on the morning of 30 April 1975 there were still eleven Marines on the roof. They were lifted off about a half-hour later.

 

How does that relative to amateur radio? As Secretary of the association, I’ve traveled to Marshalltown, Iowa each year for most of the last two decades to present scholarships in memory of one of our Marines who died in the rocket attack the morning the evacuation began. Lance Corporal Darwin L. Judge – the Marine who was killed - was a member of the 1974 graduating class at Marshalltown High School (he was one of the final KIA’s of the Vietnam War and died about 10 months following his high school graduation).  Each year our association awards two scholarships in his memory at MHS to Eagle Scouts who are members of the local scouting programs. Darwin was an Eagle Scout prior to enlisting in the Marine Corps so we felt it right that the scholarships should go to other Eagle Scouts.

 

Over the years, I’ve stood on the stage during the high school’s awards evening and spoken of my friend, shared a few words about our shared time in Saigon and the importance of service then called the recipients of the scholarships forward to be recognized. Two of those scholarship winners were Matthew Ingram in 2008 and his brother, Joel Ingram, in 2011.  On Sunday (yesterday) I was playing around on FT8 and one of the parties responding to my CQ was AE0DI.  Like I do each time I log an FT8  QSO in QRZ, I took a quick look at the bio and noticed the operator’s QTH: Marshalltown, Iowa (its a small community of less than 30,000 cut out of rolling corn fields about an hour northeast of De Moines). Although I didn’t recognize the significance of the gentleman’s name, I did recognize Marshalltown so sent him a brief follow-up telling him I’ve actually been to Marshalltown and were friends with a local farming family. Low and behold, AE0DI is David Ingram, the father of Mathew and Joel mentioned above. 

David (AE0DI) filled me in on his sons: Matthew graduated with a BS in Athletic Training from the University of Northern Iowa and also earned a Master of Health Care Administration from Des Moines University.   Joel graduated with a BS in Athletic Training from the University of Northern Iowa and a Doctor of Physical Therapy from The University of Iowa.  Both boys are doing well.  Hopefully I'll be able to look them up next time I'm in Marshalltown - probably in 2022. 

Anyway, just a chance encounter on a Sunday afternoon playing FT8 on 20m.

73, Ken


Re: Cheap Yaesu C4 Fusion Radio! #digital #emcomm

KM6YKX - Rob Newburn
 

Yeah...cancelling transaction with bank now...it does look sketchy...
Sorry,
Rob


MOTA SOTA #sota

KM6YKX - Rob Newburn
 

This was on Saturday 2/27/21 from Goat Mountain (about 6,000'). This area is about 95 miles NW of Auburn and north of Clearlake in the eastern Mendocino Forest.

There is no cell service at the staging area (Davis Flat) and cell signals even struggled on the summits and ridges...but ham radio didn't!

73,
Rob KM6YKX


Re: Cheap Yaesu C4 Fusion Radio! #digital #emcomm

Brian - AI6US
 

Something very wrong with this site. 99.9% - Looks to be a scam.

Everything from cheap antennas to name brand radios are priced between $60 - $70. 
--
Brian- AI6US


Cheap Yaesu C4 Fusion Radio! #digital #emcomm

KM6YKX - Rob Newburn
 

Hello,

Anyone needing a low price dual band radio that will also do fusion look here!

https://www.vosewu.com/ftm-7250dr-ftm-7250-original-yaesu-dual-band-144-430-mhz-digital-moblie-transceiver-50w?msclkid=3de9efd3f6381379a5e28fefce7a65a8

Thanks,
Rob KM6YKX


Nice animated visualization of dipole length vs current distribution, E-field, and lobes

Jef - N5JEF
 

I would have included this in my antenna course if I'd had it.


[AMSAT-BB] ARISS News Release No. 21-14

Greg - KO6TH
 

Hi folks,

TOMORROW (Monday) morning!  8:22am our time, 145.800 mhz.

One last pass where we are within the footprint.  Not quite as good, and a bit earlier in the day.  The pass starts here at 8:22am (so we'll be missing the very start), and it goes north of us.  Aim a little east of north, if you have a beam.

Again, see how well your answers match the Astronaut's.

Greg  KO6TH

P.s. to Marv...  Is this anywhere your alternate QTH?

p.p.s, there will be another on Wednesday, but it's at about 5am...


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: [AMSAT-BB] ARISS News Release No. 21-14
Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2021 05:50:40 +0000 (UTC)
From: David Jordan <n4csitwo@...>
To: AMSAT BB <amsat-bb@...>


                                                                                                                                   

 

ARISS News Release                                                                                        No. 21-14

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

aa4kn@...

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE



ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at

Newcastle High School, Newcastle, Wyoming, USA

 

February 27, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

 

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from Newcastle High School. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS astronaut Mike Hopkins, amateur radio call sign KF5LJG, during the ARISS radio contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz. Since the first ARISS contact on December 21, 2000, this will be the first ARISS-sponsored contact to a Wyoming school.

 

ARISS team member David Payne, using call sign NA7V in Portland, OR will serve as the relay amateur radio station. Each student asking a question will be conferenced in from home or social-distanced at school.

 

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for March 1, 2021 at 9:20 am MST (Newcastle, WY) (16:20 UTC, 11:20 pm EST, 10:20 am CST, 8:20 am PST).

 

Newcastle High School (grades 9 – 12) is a rural, public school, and part of the Weston County Public School District, which serves students (grades K-12, ages 5-18) in communities in the county in northeastern Wyoming. Newcastle HS offers college preparatory courses, a concurrent/dual enrollment college class program as well as a vocational-technical training program. Newcastle HS’s amateur radio club includes activities that allow students to learn how to operate ham radios and build antennas with curriculum tie-in to the school’s mathematics and science classes. Student activities (involving students in grades K-12) prior to the ARISS contact were designed to increase awareness and interest in amateur radio, and STEM education, and to foster an appreciation for STEM in a student’s future career choices. The school has partnered with members of the North East Wyoming Amateur Radio Association (NE7WY) who will provide technical support during this contact.

 

ARISS invites the public to view the live stream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact at https://youtu.be/qdQlKQK5mT4 .

 

_______________________________

 

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

 

1. How long did it take you to fully adjust to being on the ISS?

2. What effects have you experienced from zero gravity?

3. What do you folks do for fun? Boardgames?  Play catch in space?

4. What is the most interesting thing you have seen on a spacewalk?

5. What happens when you fly into the South Atlantic Anomaly?

6. What is the most important lesson you’ve learned from your time in space?

7. What types of organisms do you grow or use in space?

8. I am asking a question for our 2nd grade class. How big is the International Space Station and what is inside? Are there bedrooms, gym, kitchen?

9. Is it weird not being able to experience night and day the same as you would on earth?

10. What research is currently being conducted? Is it biological?

11. Have you ever lost something on a spacewalk?

12. Since Spaceflight-Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome can affect mission success, does the research currently being conducted on the retina of mice take priority over other experiments?

13. What is the weirdest solution to a problem that you have tried that actually worked?

14. What is the most dangerous aspect about living and working in space?

15. What is the most exciting thing you have experienced so far?

 

ARISS – Celebrating 20 Years of Amateur Radio Continuous Operations on the ISS

 

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab-Space Station Explorers, and NASA’s Space Communications and Navigation program. The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org




.

 

Media Contact:

Dave Jordan, AA4KN

ARISS PR

                                                                              

Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. Search on Amateur Radio on the ISS and @ARISS_status.

 




Re: Talking on a Handy Talkie (HT) #elmer

Jef - N5JEF
 

I'd like to add to this, as someone who listens to radio traffic most days all day and hears a wide range of audio quality.
  • Dennis is right about holding the microphone about one inch from the mouth, and not farther.
  • But it's also important not to hold the microphone too close, because that can cause distortion from the voice being too loud.
  • Also, it's good to hold the microphone at about a 45° angle from the month to minimize plosives—those puffs of air that can also cause noise.
  • Meanwhile, try to hold the antenna near vertical, otherwise you'll lose signal strength due to cross-polarization.  This doesn't make any difference if you have signal strength to burn, but it can make a big difference with weak signals, and it's a good habit to practice.
  • On the subject of signal strength, moving just a few inches can sometimes make a significant difference in signal strength due to multipath effects, and generally, higher is better.
  • When giving a signal report, keep in mind that RF signal strength into the repeater, and audio quality are two completely separate things.  A weak RF signal has white noise along with it.  Weak or distorted audio may or may not have white noise with it, but it can be too quiet, or distorted.
  • If you're in a windy or noisy environment, you can cup your hand(s) around the microphone and make a big difference.
  • If you're using an external palm microphone, you may need to change a setting in your radio to match the output level of that microphone.
  • If you're using an external palm microphone, remember that you can hold the radio high over your head if necessary to get past ground clutter, while still holding the microphone close to your mouth.
  • Some external microphones sound tinny due to narrow frequency response.  Some have a noise canceling feature. Some have selectable gain. Shop around and compare before selecting an external microphone.
Also on the subject of portable radio operation, it's good to understand and be aware of potential desense (receiver blocking) when near other portables, mobiles, base, or repeater stations that may be transmitting (even though not on the same frequency.)  It happens all the time when a group of hams are standing together and when one transmits, the others cannot hear anything (even that same repeater 600kHz or 5MHz offset) on their own radios. Much worse if the transmitter is a nearby higher-powered mobile or base. This can be critical in an emergency situation. This is the key difference between the cheapest transceivers and the good ones.

Remember that club members can use a special DTMF sequence to record and play back their audio so they can hear it for themselves.

- Jef  N5JEF

On Sun, Feb 28, 2021 at 9:36 AM Dennis - WU6X <wu6x@...> wrote:
Let me start by say this at least one time, "An HT is NOT a cell phone!" I know, it's hard to break the habit.

New users of HT's (and some not-so-new users) tend to hold and use an HT like a cell phone. This method does NOT produce good audio through a repeater system. HT's MUST be held at least 1" distance from the mouth to the mic pinhole in the front of all HT's.

NOTE: Any distance further than 1" from your mouth will NOT produce enough audio for people to hear you well through a repeater system.

Please, just try holding your HT closer to your mouth and you will be heard just fine and get less requests for repeats.
Thank you and 73,
Dennis - WU6X


Talking on a Handy Talkie (HT) #elmer

Dennis - WU6X
 
Edited

Let me start by say this at least one time, "An HT is NOT a cell phone!" I know, it's hard to break the habit.

New users of HT's (and some not-so-new users) tend to hold and use an HT like a cell phone. This method does NOT produce good audio through a repeater system. HT's MUST be held at least 1" distance from the mouth to the mic pinhole in the front of all HT's. Then, talk "across" the front of the radio, not directly into it.

NOTE: Any distance further than 1" from your mouth will NOT produce enough audio for people to hear you well through a repeater system.

Please, just try holding your HT closer to your mouth and you will be heard just fine and get less requests for repeats. 
Thank you and 73,
Dennis - WU6X


NanoVNA User's Guide #elmer

Dennis - WU6X
 

One of the better, simpler User Guides that I found, with good menu maps and screen shots. Of course, there are other more in-depth manuals available, and I've attached a translated version of one as well from Github, last updated Dec 2019. I recommend trying the simple 13-page version (NanoVNA User Guide.pdf) first as it may provide all you'll need to get going.
73,
Dennis - WU6X


Re: Extra Class Lab VHF Help

Greg - KO6TH
 

Hi Orion,

The setup I have in my car is mostly for Packet, but it can do JS8Call
(made one whole contact on Winter Field Day) and I should be able to get
FLDIGI running on it for PSK31. It's not exactly intended to be
portable outside of the car, but could be in a pinch (some disassembly
required). Or, remote connect to it if it can be parked within WiFi
range (not likely at Rec park). Or take a subset of folks on a short
field trip to the car?

So, I maybe I can help?

But with one rig on VHF, who would you be talking to?

Greg KO6TH


Orion - AI6JB wrote:

Good Point Greg!

I am thinking PSK31, RTTY, or other keyboard type digital mode where
the students can converse. We will already have two other HF digital
stations on site running PSK31 & FT8.

73
Orion, AI6JB


Re: Extra Class Lab VHF Help

Orion - AI6JB
 

Good Point Greg!

I am thinking PSK31, RTTY, or other keyboard type digital mode where the students can converse.  We will already have two other HF digital stations on site running PSK31 & FT8.

73
Orion, AI6JB


Re: Extra Class Lab VHF Help

Greg - KO6TH
 

Hi Orion,

"VHF Digital" as in ...?  Are you looking for something packet-based (APRS, Winlink, etc), or digital audio (DSTAR, Fusion), or traditional modes like RTTY, PSK31, FT-8, et al?

Lots of "digitals" out there.

Greg  KO6TH


Orion - AI6JB wrote:

Good Morning Everyone!

The Extra Class will have it's first Lab on Saturday, 3/6/21, roughly between 10:00 - 14:00 at Recreation Park in Auburn.  The focus will be digital communications.  

If at all possible, I would like to run a VHF digital station.  My question, is anyone is capable of VHF Digital comms and would you be available?

73
Orion, AI6JB


Extra Class Lab VHF Help

Orion - AI6JB
 

Good Morning Everyone!

The Extra Class will have it's first Lab on Saturday, 3/6/21, roughly between 10:00 - 14:00 at Recreation Park in Auburn.  The focus will be digital communications.  

If at all possible, I would like to run a VHF digital station.  My question, is anyone is capable of VHF Digital comms and would you be available?

73
Orion, AI6JB


Nano-Nano #elmer

Dennis - WU6X
 

Well folks, I was debating whether to put it up for sale before it even arrived, after viewing a half-dozen "how to" videos ... OMG, some by people must think we eat and breath this stuff for breakfast. If you stop reading here, note that everything actually came together and made perfect sense at the end of my learning curve (3-hour tour)!

My NanoVNA H4 finally arrived today and I thought, "Why not at least calibrate it before I decide to sell it?" So, I found a YouTube video that spoke my language and got into the calibration routines and setup of some basic sweeps. As it turns out, you can "keep it simple" enough to do some basic things like check antenna VSWR. This was easy to setup ... with the video playing on a second monitor, of course. If you think these little boxes are intuitive, think again. Of course, if you are an engineer, like to learn new, complex things, or are somewhat masochistic, you'll love this little box.

So, off I dived into 8 layers of menus (BTW, the chart I posted earlier helps) and setup 3 sweep memories, HF, VHF and UHF, calibrated each, and saved them for later recall depending upon what antenna I want to evaluate. Then I thought, "Why not download the software for my computer and give that a go?" I should have stopped while I was gaining ground!

I found a video that explained NanoVNASaver, "the software" pretty well ... Getting a copy that would run on my laptop was challenging, however. Finally, I found a version that ran and displayed a screen that looked like the one in the chosen "how to" video. There are lot's of parameters to setup in the software. Also, the "bands" saved as default are not US Amateur frequencies, and there were some that I will never use, so I removed them. Out came the ARRL Amateur Radio Bands chart and corrections/updates were made.

Then, I ran into trouble ... calibration with the software would not save without errors regardless of what the video tutorial was teaching. The speaker was bald, so the video may have been made after the calibrations were completed. I gave up while I still had my hair ... maybe I'll try again in the morning when my mind is sharp, after I find another video by a guy with lots of hair.

In the end, I used this little box to look at a tri-band Comet HT antenna I thought broke a few weeks ago when the HT fell over ... antenna first onto the floor. I was right ... now headed for the trash. I checked another and it looked good with decent SWR. Then I checked my 128-foot longwire fed with the 64:1 transformer. Interestingly, the best resonant points corresponded with what I've been seeing on my radio's SWR meter ... happy again!

Final comments: This is a powerful piece of test equipment, once setup properly, and it works well. It's not as easy to use as a RigExpert or MFJ antenna analyzer, but ...for less than $80, it provides a lot of testing capability ... more than I will ever use, and in a very small package that will fit in your pocket!
73,
Dennis - WU6X



Re: Radio Direction Finding Project Contributors? #wanted

Jon - KI6RT
 

At the last RDF meeting I took the action to 1) draft an RDF antenna proposal and 2) explain RDF fundamentals. For those of you for whom I have your emails we met to discuss how the RDF circuit works. If you want to be included in these ad hoc Technical Zooms please email me at jon@... and I will add you to the distribution (or you can go and add yourself to the distribution list in the FILES section of this groups.io). For the antenna I have attached a hand sketch of what I am thinking about building. Recall this project is not about a ONE & ONLY DESIGN but and modular construct that allows anyone to experiment with ideas of their own while still integrating into the club's design.

Antenna Concept Attached:
  1. My Requirements
    1. Something that is easy to transport
    2. Something I can use at the base station, portable or while mobile
    3. Something that can be quickly and easily configured to work on various VHF/UHF frequencies (i.e. dipoles can be adjusted, doppler radius can be adjusted)
    4. Can be constructed using COTS (commercial off the shelf)
  2. Feedback
    1. The mechanical design for extending/collapsing the array needs input/suggestions -- all opinions welcome!


SFARC Net - Thu, 02/25/2021 #cal-notice

sfarc@w6ek.groups.io Calendar <noreply@...>
 

SFARC Net

When:
Thursday, 25 February 2021
7:30pm to 8:30pm
(GMT-08:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:
W6EK Repeater - 145.430 -600, PL162.2

Description:
Check-in for Club updates from Officers and members, QSTs and more. Everyone is welcome!


New CQ hits the mailbox

Carl - WF6J
 

This Magazine, CQ was started the year I was born. 1945. Not as popular as QST, but outlasted all the others and still going strong.

This month features QRP. Also covers Satellite operations, Yagi mounting tips and more.

73,
Carl, WF6J
ARRL PIO


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