Date   

Re: Nano VNA

Orion, AI6JB
 

Per the Coffee Break Net, here is the link to the Amazon NanoVNA I purchase for those interested:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B083PQ4RXZ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

73

Orion, AI6JB

 

From: ojendres@... <ojendres@...>
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2020 08:25
To: 'sfarc@w6ek.groups.io' <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io>; 'wu6x@...' <wu6x@...>
Subject: RE: [from W6EK Groups.io] Nano VNA

 

I just purchased the NanoVNA H4.  It’s just over one week old.

 

Mine was shipped with firmware dated Jan 2020.  There is a newer version issued in Feb 2020 that resolves a touchscreen issue.  Highly recommend you up grade right away.

 

If anyone needs a little help, I’ll share what I found.

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis - WU6X
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2020 08:17
To: Clyde Campbell <ab4cc1@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Nano VNA

 

Thanks Clyde. I'm still not sure which one I want to buy ... I really don't "need" one, but thought looking at 3 to 4 more weeks of self-imprisonment, it might be fun to play with.
73, Dennis-WU6X


Re: Nano VNA

Orion, AI6JB
 

I just purchased the NanoVNA H4.  It’s just over one week old.

 

Mine was shipped with firmware dated Jan 2020.  There is a newer version issued in Feb 2020 that resolves a touchscreen issue.  Highly recommend you up grade right away.

 

If anyone needs a little help, I’ll share what I found.

 

73

Orion Endres, AI6JB

1201 Wood Oak Court, Roseville, CA 95747-7383

(916) 788-8251 H \\ (916) 534-8251 C

 

What the heck does “73” mean?  73 is morse code short hand for “Best Regards” used by Ham radio operators.  It’s origin goes all the way back to the landline telegraph days.

 

 

 

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis - WU6X
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2020 08:17
To: Clyde Campbell <ab4cc1@...>; sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Nano VNA

 

Thanks Clyde. I'm still not sure which one I want to buy ... I really don't "need" one, but thought looking at 3 to 4 more weeks of self-imprisonment, it might be fun to play with.
73, Dennis-WU6X


Re: Nano VNA

Dennis - WU6X
 

Thanks Clyde. I'm still not sure which one I want to buy ... I really don't "need" one, but thought looking at 3 to 4 more weeks of self-imprisonment, it might be fun to play with.
73, Dennis-WU6X


Nano VNA

Clyde Campbell
 

Per this mornings Coffee Break net NANO VNA discussion. Manuals are usually bad translation form Chinese. An excellent tutorial Has been written  by Gunthard Kraus. DG8GB. his website is: http://www.gunthard-kraus.de .He has an English page. there is also a NANO VNA groups.io.
73
Clyde AB4CC


Re: Coronavirus and misinformation that is floating around like airborne cooties

Greg D
 

Yep, that's certainly a concern.  Worse, the air conditioning system can push those clouds of "airspace" around.  I can't hold my breath long enough to do a complete shopping run.  Bringing a SCUBA tank might be an option?  Just leave the flippers at home...

But, I think the idea is that if everyone is wearing a mask of some kind, then the particles of bad stuff from the few that are unknowingly infected will be kept inside their mask, so there's nothing bad for you to breath in.

Greg  KO6TH


Jef - N5JEF wrote:

Thanks Jim.  It's useful information, and I guess even we "technical" folk can benefit from reminders to respect science--not as absolute truth, but generally much more reliable than anecdote and folklore.  [Kinda the same with antenna theory, but I digress..]

Another thought that I haven't seen mentioned _anywhere_:  Do people realize that when they are walking through the grocery keeping a "safe" 6 feet of distance, they are actually passing through the previous persons' airspace at a pretty fast rate...?

- Jef 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 1:45 PM Jim - N6MED <n6medjim@...> wrote:

Full disclosure for those in the club that don’t know my background:
I am a registered nurse, retired from the Auburn Faith Hospital telemetry medical unit. “Telemetry medical” pertains to acute care for those who have a primary medical condition with an underlying heart condition.

For the Common Good, with permission of the group, I’m frustrated by so much misinformation “out there” put forth by the ignorant in the media. By BS meter starts bouncing in the red zone as soon as I hear someone say “I heard that …” without citing the source.

Regardless of your favorite media outlet, whether cable, broadcast, FaceBook, Twitter, or whatever, I hold the opinion that the only reliable information on SARS-Cov-2 (the cootie, a Coronavirus) and COVID-19 (the disease one gets) is from medical and scientific resources. There are many of these, including but certainly not limited to the CDC, WHO, Johns-Hopkins, Stanford Medical, etc. etc. Certainly the medical and scientific experts reporting on the media are reliable sources, e.g., Dr. Fauci, Dr. Birx, Dr. Gupta (though a neurologist know what questions to ask of his expert colleagues). I’ve found off-shore resources as well that have reliable info based on science.

With all the conversation relating to droplet and contact precautions, there is a lot of confusion (and even inconsistent term usage by doctors) regarding “airborne,” “aerosol,” and “droplet.” Now, with the cautions re infected folks shedding virus (i.e., being infectious) several days before they are symptomatic, the term “airborne” becomes even clouded.

In the context of “airborne” I think of Legionnaires disease which was spread through the HVAC system of the convention facility/hotel in 1976 (Ref: https://www.medicinenet.com/legionnaire_disease_and_pontiac_fever/article.htm). Also, measles and TB where contagion (i.e., infectious particles) dwell time in the air can be anywhere from 30 min to several hours. “Aerosole” is that fine mist that accompanies the spray of a sneeze or speaks (the latter that is currently cited by the CDC as the means of transmission of asymptomatic infected individuals).

According to recent research at Virginia Tech, Linsey Marr, an aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still so it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter." Even a 5 micrometer droplet can linger in the air. "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still," says Marr. "So it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter."
(Refs re airborne, aerosol, and droplet: https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/04/03/825639323/scientists-probe-how-coronavirus-might-travel-through-the-air)

http://ata-medical.com/2017/04/03/what-is-airborne-transmission/

https://emcrit.org/ibcc/covid19/#transmission

 

Contact is, well, contact, i.e., touching an inanimate object that has been contaminated either by an infected individual transferring cooties to it (poorly washed hands touching a surface) or droplets from a sneeze or cough.  

We just watched the movie (available on Netflix) Contagion. Besides the usual dramatization, Hollywood did it right. Released in 2011, IMHO, it offers a realistic portrayal of what we are facing right now. Fortunately, the mortality rate (thus far) is much less than that depicted in the movie.

If you’ve hung in here with me this far, you deserve a chuckle. Enjoy this bit from Jimmy Kimmel and Samuel L. Jackson:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSrbxyna4z4


Lastly, a link Dennis WU6X passed onto me: https://ncov2019.live/


It's all about science where it's better to figure stuff out than make shit up. Jus' sayin'

Stay well!!!
Jim / N6MED

 



Re: Coronavirus and misinformation that is floating around like airborne cooties

Jef - N5JEF
 

Thanks Jim.  It's useful information, and I guess even we "technical" folk can benefit from reminders to respect science--not as absolute truth, but generally much more reliable than anecdote and folklore.  [Kinda the same with antenna theory, but I digress..]

Another thought that I haven't seen mentioned _anywhere_:  Do people realize that when they are walking through the grocery keeping a "safe" 6 feet of distance, they are actually passing through the previous persons' airspace at a pretty fast rate...?

- Jef 

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 1:45 PM Jim - N6MED <n6medjim@...> wrote:

Full disclosure for those in the club that don’t know my background:
I am a registered nurse, retired from the Auburn Faith Hospital telemetry medical unit. “Telemetry medical” pertains to acute care for those who have a primary medical condition with an underlying heart condition.

For the Common Good, with permission of the group, I’m frustrated by so much misinformation “out there” put forth by the ignorant in the media. By BS meter starts bouncing in the red zone as soon as I hear someone say “I heard that …” without citing the source.

Regardless of your favorite media outlet, whether cable, broadcast, FaceBook, Twitter, or whatever, I hold the opinion that the only reliable information on SARS-Cov-2 (the cootie, a Coronavirus) and COVID-19 (the disease one gets) is from medical and scientific resources. There are many of these, including but certainly not limited to the CDC, WHO, Johns-Hopkins, Stanford Medical, etc. etc. Certainly the medical and scientific experts reporting on the media are reliable sources, e.g., Dr. Fauci, Dr. Birx, Dr. Gupta (though a neurologist know what questions to ask of his expert colleagues). I’ve found off-shore resources as well that have reliable info based on science.

With all the conversation relating to droplet and contact precautions, there is a lot of confusion (and even inconsistent term usage by doctors) regarding “airborne,” “aerosol,” and “droplet.” Now, with the cautions re infected folks shedding virus (i.e., being infectious) several days before they are symptomatic, the term “airborne” becomes even clouded.

In the context of “airborne” I think of Legionnaires disease which was spread through the HVAC system of the convention facility/hotel in 1976 (Ref: https://www.medicinenet.com/legionnaire_disease_and_pontiac_fever/article.htm). Also, measles and TB where contagion (i.e., infectious particles) dwell time in the air can be anywhere from 30 min to several hours. “Aerosole” is that fine mist that accompanies the spray of a sneeze or speaks (the latter that is currently cited by the CDC as the means of transmission of asymptomatic infected individuals).

According to recent research at Virginia Tech, Linsey Marr, an aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still so it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter." Even a 5 micrometer droplet can linger in the air. "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still," says Marr. "So it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter."
(Refs re airborne, aerosol, and droplet: https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/04/03/825639323/scientists-probe-how-coronavirus-might-travel-through-the-air)

http://ata-medical.com/2017/04/03/what-is-airborne-transmission/

https://emcrit.org/ibcc/covid19/#transmission

 

Contact is, well, contact, i.e., touching an inanimate object that has been contaminated either by an infected individual transferring cooties to it (poorly washed hands touching a surface) or droplets from a sneeze or cough.  

We just watched the movie (available on Netflix) Contagion. Besides the usual dramatization, Hollywood did it right. Released in 2011, IMHO, it offers a realistic portrayal of what we are facing right now. Fortunately, the mortality rate (thus far) is much less than that depicted in the movie.

If you’ve hung in here with me this far, you deserve a chuckle. Enjoy this bit from Jimmy Kimmel and Samuel L. Jackson:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSrbxyna4z4


Lastly, a link Dennis WU6X passed onto me: https://ncov2019.live/


It's all about science where it's better to figure stuff out than make shit up. Jus' sayin'

Stay well!!!
Jim / N6MED

 


Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Jim - N6MED
 

Sorry if I lacked clarity in my first response.

1. The "dust mask" so far as I can tell is made of paper and less porous than the pleated cloth mask and, IN MY OPINION the better option. My wife wears the dust mask when she has ventured out to shop. A cloth mask, again, IMHO, would be better suited for one who is infected and coughing or sneezing. It's all about blocking cooties from gozinta or gozouta, whichever side of the mask you are on.

2. If one ventures out to shop, wearing gloves ("inspection" or "exam" gloves, whether nitrile, vinyl, or even latex) might be useful if you have open cuts or sores on your hands. But, simple course would be to use those wipes stores make available to wipe off the grocery cart handle/push bar. Just go for t a wipe that is still wet. After wiping, give it a few moments to dry.

Watching Dr. Sanjay Gupta, MD last eve, he brings his groceries into his house and divides his kitchen counter into  "dirty" and  "clean" halves. Ref: https://www.cnn.com/videos/health/2020/04/03/sanjay-gupta-wiping-cleaning-groceries-demo-town-hall-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/novel-coronavirus-explained/

My wife leaves all but the cold stuff in our garage for 48 hours then uses those household wipes (the ones that claim to kill 99% of cooties) on the packages before bring them inside. And, she has her shopping clothes left in the garage, changing before she comes in the house.

Else, IMHO, your plan looks good to me, especially the part about hand washing!

3. Nice offer from your daughter's boyfriend. But where have his hands been? Is he as attentive to social distancing and hygiene as you are? If my Valery wasn't going out to shop (and she is r-e-a-l-l-y careful in a store). I think using Bel Air's (and Raley's) on-line shopping and home delivery would be  a great solution. Dennis / WU6X can offer first hand experience there.

Jim / N6MED

On 4/5/2020 2:11 PM, Greg D wrote:
Hi Jim,

Ok, so let me ask a little differently.  Given that I strongly do not believe that I have been exposed - been at home with only the cat for the past 3 weeks except for one outage a week ago to get cat food (did a parking lot pickup) - then should I:

a)  Wear the "dust mask", or
b)  Make a cloth-based pleated mask as shown in the NYT article (https://www.nytimes.com/article/how-to-make-face-mask-coronavirus.html)

Is either choice about the same?

Second question... 

I've not seen much by way of guidance on the use of gloves.  Presume yes.  I have a box of the blue "Nitrile" type.  Put them on when I exit the car, shop, take them off (taking care not to touch the outsides) after putting stuff in the car and dumping the cart back in its corral.  Use brown paper bags instead of the reusable plastic kind (virus life is shorter on cardboard).  Wash hands when I get home before and after I put stuff away.  Good plan?

Third question (sorry!)...  My daughter's boyfriend is offering to go shopping for me.  But I'm thinking it would be safer for me to go by myself during Safeway's "old folks hours" (Tues / Thur early morning) than for him to come up from the Lincoln area to Auburn to shop, or to shop down in Lincoln and transport the groceries up to Auburn.  I.e., best not to travel between the two areas, especially when there are specific hours at the local Auburn store dedicated to higher-risk folks.  Yes?

Thanks for the guidance,

Greg  KO6TH



Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Greg D
 
Edited

Hi Jim,

Ok, so let me ask a little differently.  Given that I strongly do not believe that I have been exposed - been at home with only the cat for the past 3 weeks except for one outage a week ago to get cat food (did a parking lot pickup) - then should I:

a)  Wear the "dust mask", or
b)  Make a cloth-based pleated mask as shown in the NYT article (https://www.nytimes.com/article/how-to-make-face-mask-coronavirus.html)

Is either choice about the same?

Second question... 

I've not seen much by way of guidance on the use of gloves.  Presume yes.  I have a box of the blue "Nitrile" type.  Put them on when I exit the car, shop, take them off (taking care not to touch the outsides) after putting stuff in the car and dumping the cart back in its corral.  Use brown paper bags instead of the reusable plastic kind (virus life is shorter on cardboard).  Wash hands when I get home before and after I put stuff away.  Good plan?

Third question (sorry!)...  My daughter's boyfriend is offering to go shopping for me.  But I'm thinking it would be safer for me to go by myself during Safeway's "old folks hours" (Tues / Thur early morning) than for him to come up from the Lincoln area to Auburn to shop, or to shop down in Lincoln and transport the groceries up to Auburn.  I.e., best not to travel between the two areas, especially when there are specific hours at the local Auburn store dedicated to higher-risk folks.  Yes?

Thanks for the guidance,

Greg  KO6TH


Jim - N6MED wrote:

Greg --
You are spot on re "... protect others from someone who is sick ..."
The dust masks you find at the hardware, from what I'm able to tell when compared to similar masks available for one time use on a medical unit are w-a-y better than a cotton scarf or cotton home made mask if you are trying to protect yourself from a spit-spray cloud left hanging in the air by someone who just sneezed. Cotton seems way to porous.

But, fit is everything.

The quandry is that an infected individual would wear a mask to prevent expelling mist or droplets into his/her surroundings. A non-infected individual would wear one to prevent inhaling "large" droplets (a relative term, ref the link in my post that follows). I typically worn this type of mask to protect me when entering a patients room who had a respiratory disease (e.g., the flu). A care giver would wear an N-95 (or even an N-100) to protect against 3 micron and smaller infections particulates.

BTW: I exchanged texts with a critical care (i.e., ICU) nurse friend who works at Sutter Auburn Faith hospital. The nurses over there are in dire straits. She said "We are rationed 1 surgical mask per day (worn 24/7 except meals) and N-95 is for 1 RN per shift. No one is allowed in COVID rooms except RN, MD, or RT" (RT=respiratory therapists). If anyone has a stash of N-95s or a group can make a bunch of surgical masks (shop towel material?), maybe it could help those on the front lines over there.

One style of surgical mask. Note, that with this and similar designs, after securing the lower tie, the pleats are pulled apart as the mask is pulled up over the nose.



Stay well!!!


Coronavirus and misinformation that is floating around like airborne cooties

Jim - N6MED
 

Full disclosure for those in the club that don’t know my background:
I am a registered nurse, retired from the Auburn Faith Hospital telemetry medical unit. “Telemetry medical” pertains to acute care for those who have a primary medical condition with an underlying heart condition.

For the Common Good, with permission of the group, I’m frustrated by so much misinformation “out there” put forth by the ignorant in the media. By BS meter starts bouncing in the red zone as soon as I hear someone say “I heard that …” without citing the source.

Regardless of your favorite media outlet, whether cable, broadcast, FaceBook, Twitter, or whatever, I hold the opinion that the only reliable information on SARS-Cov-2 (the cootie, a Coronavirus) and COVID-19 (the disease one gets) is from medical and scientific resources. There are many of these, including but certainly not limited to the CDC, WHO, Johns-Hopkins, Stanford Medical, etc. etc. Certainly the medical and scientific experts reporting on the media are reliable sources, e.g., Dr. Fauci, Dr. Birx, Dr. Gupta (though a neurologist know what questions to ask of his expert colleagues). I’ve found off-shore resources as well that have reliable info based on science.

With all the conversation relating to droplet and contact precautions, there is a lot of confusion (and even inconsistent term usage by doctors) regarding “airborne,” “aerosol,” and “droplet.” Now, with the cautions re infected folks shedding virus (i.e., being infectious) several days before they are symptomatic, the term “airborne” becomes even clouded.

In the context of “airborne” I think of Legionnaires disease which was spread through the HVAC system of the convention facility/hotel in 1976 (Ref: https://www.medicinenet.com/legionnaire_disease_and_pontiac_fever/article.htm). Also, measles and TB where contagion (i.e., infectious particles) dwell time in the air can be anywhere from 30 min to several hours. “Aerosole” is that fine mist that accompanies the spray of a sneeze or speaks (the latter that is currently cited by the CDC as the means of transmission of asymptomatic infected individuals).

According to recent research at Virginia Tech, Linsey Marr, an aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still so it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter." Even a 5 micrometer droplet can linger in the air. "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still," says Marr. "So it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter."
(Refs re airborne, aerosol, and droplet: https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/04/03/825639323/scientists-probe-how-coronavirus-might-travel-through-the-air)

http://ata-medical.com/2017/04/03/what-is-airborne-transmission/

https://emcrit.org/ibcc/covid19/#transmission

 

Contact is, well, contact, i.e., touching an inanimate object that has been contaminated either by an infected individual transferring cooties to it (poorly washed hands touching a surface) or droplets from a sneeze or cough.  

We just watched the movie (available on Netflix) Contagion. Besides the usual dramatization, Hollywood did it right. Released in 2011, IMHO, it offers a realistic portrayal of what we are facing right now. Fortunately, the mortality rate (thus far) is much less than that depicted in the movie.

If you’ve hung in here with me this far, you deserve a chuckle. Enjoy this bit from Jimmy Kimmel and Samuel L. Jackson:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSrbxyna4z4


Lastly, a link Dennis WU6X passed onto me: https://ncov2019.live/


It's all about science where it's better to figure stuff out than make shit up. Jus' sayin'

Stay well!!!
Jim / N6MED

 


Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Jim - N6MED
 
Edited

Greg --
You are spot on re "... protect others from someone who is sick ..."
The dust masks you find at the hardware, from what I'm able to tell when compared to similar masks available for one time use on a medical unit are w-a-y better than a cotton scarf or cotton home made mask if you are trying to protect yourself from a spit-spray cloud left hanging in the air by someone who just sneezed. Cotton seems way to porous.

But, fit is everything.

The quandry is that an infected individual would wear a mask to prevent expelling mist or droplets into his/her surroundings. A non-infected individual would wear one to prevent inhaling "large" droplets (a relative term, ref the link in my post that follows). I typically worn this type of mask to protect me when entering a patients room who had a respiratory disease (e.g., the flu). A care giver would wear an N-95 (or even an N-100) to protect against 3 micron and smaller infections particulates.

BTW: I exchanged texts with a critical care (i.e., ICU) nurse friend who works at Sutter Auburn Faith hospital. The nurses over there are in dire straits. She said "We are rationed 1 surgical mask per day (worn 24/7 except meals) and N-95 is for 1 RN per shift. No one is allowed in COVID rooms except RN, MD, or RT" (RT=respiratory therapists). If anyone has a stash of N-95s or a group can make a bunch of surgical masks (shop towel material?), maybe it could help those on the front lines over there.

One style of surgical mask. Note, that with this and similar designs, after securing the lower tie, the pleats are pulled apart as the mask is pulled up over the nose.



Stay well!!!


Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Greg D
 

Hi Jim,

Thanks for the info!  A question:

Would a simple non-M95 "dust mask" work as well as a hand-made cotton mask or scarf?  As I understand the purpose, the idea is to protect others from someone who is sick but is not yet symptomatic.  So, droplet containment on the inside is what they're after, not preventing ingress from the outside.

Greg  KO6TH


Jim - N6MED wrote:

Gentlemen, thanks for sharing all.  There is a lot of info and videos "out there" re rolling your own. Folks seem to be paying more attention to mask construction and little to proper donning and doffing. With all the video in the media of folks wearing masks, from Asians on the street in the home countries to even docs in a US ER, it's very apparent (to this retired professional, at least), that folks aren't wearing masks correctly.
Proper fit is equally as important as constructing an effective mask, for, if you don't put it on properly all your construction efforts will be for naught.

When "donning" (putting on) a mask, regardless if it has ear loops or a pair of ties, the malleable strip of metal at your nose must be formed across your nose bridge using two fingers to form it on both sides of your nose.Do NOT pinch the metal piece between your thumb and forefinger to form it else a gap will be formed with a resulting air leak.

If the mask has ties, first secure one around your neck fitting the mask under your chin, pull upper part of the mask up over the bridge of your nose, then secure the second tie above your ears and behind your head.

Humor me: I've included a couple of video links that show proper procedure for donning and doffing "surgical" masks.

Donning and Doffing Facial Protection (mask)
Mask with ear loops:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6mjqbtonG4Mask
With ties:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWnTCZWYOBw

Blue shop towels as an an improved material over cotton for home made mask:
https://www.businessinsider.com/homemade-mask-using-hydro-knit-shop-towel-filters-better-2020-4

Caution: Do not use hepa filter (e.g., Kirby vacuum hepa filters) to make a mask:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiYbXsIcI7E
(I didn't know this and, other than what this particular MD says about hepa filters, I cannot attest to the use of fiberglass in the construction of hepa filters.)

Stay well, everyone!
Jim / N6MED


Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Jim - N6MED
 

Gentlemen, thanks for sharing all.  There is a lot of info and videos "out there" re rolling your own. Folks seem to be paying more attention to mask construction and little to proper donning and doffing. With all the video in the media of folks wearing masks, from Asians on the street in the home countries to even docs in a US ER, it's very apparent (to this retired professional, at least), that folks aren't wearing masks correctly.
Proper fit is equally as important as constructing an effective mask, for, if you don't put it on properly all your construction efforts will be for naught.

When "donning" (putting on) a mask, regardless if it has ear loops or a pair of ties, the malleable strip of metal at your nose must be formed across your nose bridge using two fingers to form it on both sides of your nose.Do NOT pinch the metal piece between your thumb and forefinger to form it else a gap will be formed with a resulting air leak.

If the mask has ties, first secure one around your neck fitting the mask under your chin, pull upper part of the mask up over the bridge of your nose, then secure the second tie above your ears and behind your head.

Humor me: I've included a couple of video links that show proper procedure for donning and doffing "surgical" masks.

Donning and Doffing Facial Protection (mask)
Mask with ear loops:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6mjqbtonG4Mask
With ties:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWnTCZWYOBw

Blue shop towels as an an improved material over cotton for home made mask:
https://www.businessinsider.com/homemade-mask-using-hydro-knit-shop-towel-filters-better-2020-4

Caution: Do not use hepa filter (e.g., Kirby vacuum hepa filters) to make a mask:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiYbXsIcI7E
(I didn't know this and, other than what this particular MD says about hepa filters, I cannot attest to the use of fiberglass in the construction of hepa filters.)

Stay well, everyone!
Jim / N6MED


Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Jef - N5JEF
 

Thanks for sharing these Rob.  Inspiring to hear about some of the range of responses to our shared situation.

- Jef  

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 8:19 AM Rob Newburn <robnewburn@...> wrote:
My wife made some yesterday. After testing/fitting, this modification worked well to keep it tight fitting on the top around the nose. (See pic) 

Also, wifey said the nail salon ladies just put a folded tissue inside theirs.

Lastly, the female jail inmates are making masks. Apparently, you just pull up in front and a deputy will bring one out to you. Go for broke road in Roseville (justice center).

Stay safe and ham it up,
Rob KM6YKX



Re: PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Rob Newburn
 
Edited

My wife made some yesterday. After testing/fitting, this modification worked well to keep it tight fitting on the top around the nose. (See pic) 

Also, wifey said the nail salon ladies just put a folded tissue inside theirs.

Lastly, the female jail inmates are making masks. Apparently, you just pull up in front and a deputy will bring one out to you. Go for broke road in Roseville (justice center).

Stay safe and ham it up,
Rob KM6YKX



PPS Mask - Sew Your Own

Brian Gohl - AI6US
 
Edited

  http://nyti.ms/2JpHZIG     
You can also sew a HEPPA filter material inside the mask, (I think you can get them at Home Depot), or attach  a Female Sanitary panty shield inside, to prevent liquid from entering you nose and mouth. By removing the shield, its machine washable. 

Enjoy folks, jim KQ6VP


Re: Placer Health Officer now recommends face covering on top of social distancing

Orion, AI6JB
 

Thank you Carl for sharing!

Stay Healthy!

73
Orion, AI6JB


From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> on behalf of Carl - N6CKV <cfirst@...>
Sent: Friday, April 3, 2020 1:00 AM
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io>
Subject: [from W6EK Groups.io] Placer Health Officer now recommends face covering on top of social distancing
 
All

An important video from Placer County Health

https://vimeo.com/403470122/c4e12385e9


Re: O'Scope for loan? #repair

Michael Corrigan
 

I have a portable scope, Fluke 190-202, available for loan if you're still in need.

Mike Corrigan 
KK6PVS 
mjc6063@... 


Placer Health Officer now recommends face covering on top of social distancing

Carl - N6CKV
 

All

An important video from Placer County Health

https://vimeo.com/403470122/c4e12385e9


Re: Instant Pot Hardboiled Eggs

Gerry - WA6E
 

Thanks, Nathan.  Will have to try this.

Gerry
WA6E

On 4/2/2020 3:17 PM, Nathan Chilton - K6NDC wrote:

After the topic came up during the Coffee Break net this morning, I asked my wife for the hardboiled egg recipe she's been using.  She tried a number of different methods and ended up with eggs that broke apart when she was attempting to peel them, until she found this recipe.  Now, virtually every egg peels perfectly.

Instant Pot Hardboiled Eggs

  1. Plug in your Instant Pot.
  2. Place the rack that came with your Instant Pot in the bottom.
  3. Place desired number of eggs on the rack.
  4. Put 1 cup of water in the bottom of the Instant Pot.
  5. Put the lid on and lock the lid.
  6. Turn on the manual setting and set your Instant Pot to 7 minutes.
  7. Once your Instant Pot is finished use the quick release valve.
  8. Allow eggs to cool in the refrigerator until they are cool enough to handle.
  9. Peel, enjoy or make deviled eggs!


Instant Pot Hardboiled Eggs

Nathan Chilton - K6NDC
 

After the topic came up during the Coffee Break net this morning, I asked my wife for the hardboiled egg recipe she's been using.  She tried a number of different methods and ended up with eggs that broke apart when she was attempting to peel them, until she found this recipe.  Now, virtually every egg peels perfectly.

Instant Pot Hardboiled Eggs

  1. Plug in your Instant Pot.
  2. Place the rack that came with your Instant Pot in the bottom.
  3. Place desired number of eggs on the rack.
  4. Put 1 cup of water in the bottom of the Instant Pot.
  5. Put the lid on and lock the lid.
  6. Turn on the manual setting and set your Instant Pot to 7 minutes.
  7. Once your Instant Pot is finished use the quick release valve.
  8. Allow eggs to cool in the refrigerator until they are cool enough to handle.
  9. Peel, enjoy or make deviled eggs!