Date   
Re: Placer County STEM Expo

Michael - N6MRP
 

Brian,

Thanks so much! I'll add you and your equipment to the list!

73

Mike KK6GLP

On Sun, Jan 13, 2019 at 6:22 AM Brian Gohl - AI6US <ai6us@...> wrote:
Hello Mike,

I am interested in helping.

I could bring either the racked Flex 6300 or the Icom 7300. Able to provide and assist with setting a dipole wire from the roof to a truck mounted telescopic 12m Spiderbeam mast on the truck hitch.

Best Regards! 
Brian Gohl - AI6US 
(916) 770-7751 cell

-------- Original message --------
From: Michael Perry <mrprry2@...>
Date: 1/12/19 4:13 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: Carl Schultz <caschultzca@...>
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Placer County STEM Expo

Thanks Carl! I'll let Dr. Milazzo know what equipment you can bring. There may be space issues with the table so she can coordinate on what to place.

73

Mike KK6GLP

On Sat, Jan 12, 2019 at 4:05 PM Carl Schultz <caschultzca@...> wrote:
Mike,

Count me in. I can bring an HT and Satellite antenna plus iMac for display.

73,
Carl, WF6J
On Jan 12, 2019, at 9:12 AM, "Michael Perry" <mrprry2@...> wrote:

On Saturday, March 2, William Jessup University (in Rocklin) will host the Placer County STEM Expo. The ARRL's Sacramento Valley Section will have a booth with ham radio equipment in use, and information on the hobby. Various clubs in the Section will participate at the booth, including the Sierra Foothills Amateur Radio Club.

We are looking for Club members interested in staffing the booth, and informing the public of our hobby. Or, if you just want to show up and see what is going on, you are more than welcome!

All those interested, please reply to this message, or call Mike Perry at 916-945-8024.

More info on the event is found at http://stemexpo.org/about

73

Mike Perry KK6GLP
SFARC Volunteer Events Coordinator


--
Brian- AI6US

Re: Placer County STEM Expo

Brian Gohl - AI6US
 

Hello Mike,

I am interested in helping.

I could bring either the racked Flex 6300 or the Icom 7300. Able to provide and assist with setting a dipole wire from the roof to a truck mounted telescopic 12m Spiderbeam mast on the truck hitch.

Best Regards! 
Brian Gohl - AI6US 
(916) 770-7751 cell

-------- Original message --------
From: Michael Perry <mrprry2@...>
Date: 1/12/19 4:13 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: Carl Schultz <caschultzca@...>
Cc: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Placer County STEM Expo

Thanks Carl! I'll let Dr. Milazzo know what equipment you can bring. There may be space issues with the table so she can coordinate on what to place.

73

Mike KK6GLP

On Sat, Jan 12, 2019 at 4:05 PM Carl Schultz <caschultzca@...> wrote:
Mike,

Count me in. I can bring an HT and Satellite antenna plus iMac for display.

73,
Carl, WF6J
On Jan 12, 2019, at 9:12 AM, "Michael Perry" <mrprry2@...> wrote:

On Saturday, March 2, William Jessup University (in Rocklin) will host the Placer County STEM Expo. The ARRL's Sacramento Valley Section will have a booth with ham radio equipment in use, and information on the hobby. Various clubs in the Section will participate at the booth, including the Sierra Foothills Amateur Radio Club.

We are looking for Club members interested in staffing the booth, and informing the public of our hobby. Or, if you just want to show up and see what is going on, you are more than welcome!

All those interested, please reply to this message, or call Mike Perry at 916-945-8024.

More info on the event is found at http://stemexpo.org/about

73

Mike Perry KK6GLP
SFARC Volunteer Events Coordinator


--
Brian- AI6US

Re: Placer County STEM Expo

Carl Schultz <caschultzca@...>
 

Mike,

Count me in. I can bring an HT and Satellite antenna plus iMac for display.

73,
Carl, WF6J

On Jan 12, 2019, at 9:12 AM, "Michael Perry" <mrprry2@...> wrote:

On Saturday, March 2, William Jessup University (in Rocklin) will host the Placer County STEM Expo. The ARRL's Sacramento Valley Section will have a booth with ham radio equipment in use, and information on the hobby. Various clubs in the Section will participate at the booth, including the Sierra Foothills Amateur Radio Club.

We are looking for Club members interested in staffing the booth, and informing the public of our hobby. Or, if you just want to show up and see what is going on, you are more than welcome!

All those interested, please reply to this message, or call Mike Perry at 916-945-8024.

More info on the event is found at http://stemexpo.org/about

73

Mike Perry KK6GLP
SFARC Volunteer Events Coordinator

Placer County STEM Expo

Michael - N6MRP
 

On Saturday, March 2, William Jessup University (in Rocklin) will host the Placer County STEM Expo. The ARRL's Sacramento Valley Section will have a booth with ham radio equipment in use, and information on the hobby. Various clubs in the Section will participate at the booth, including the Sierra Foothills Amateur Radio Club.

We are looking for Club members interested in staffing the booth, and informing the public of our hobby. Or, if you just want to show up and see what is going on, you are more than welcome!

All those interested, please reply to this message, or call Mike Perry at 916-945-8024.

More info on the event is found at http://stemexpo.org/about

73

Mike Perry KK6GLP
SFARC Volunteer Events Coordinator

North American QSO Party - CW - Sat, 01/12/2019 10:00am-10:00pm #cal-reminder

sfarc@w6ek.groups.io Calendar <sfarc@...>
 

Reminder:
North American QSO Party - CW

When:
Saturday, 12 January 2019
10:00am to 10:00pm
(GMT-08:00) America/Los Angeles

Description:
Period: 1800 UTC January 12 to 0600 UTC January 13, 2019
Power: 100w Maximum
Exchange: Operator name and station location (state, province or country) for North American stations; operator name only for non-North American stations.
Ruleshttp://www.ncjweb.com/NAQP-Rules.pdf

View Event

SFARC Board Meeting - Fri, 01/11/2019 6:00pm-7:00pm #cal-reminder

sfarc@w6ek.groups.io Calendar <sfarc@...>
 

Reminder:
SFARC Board Meeting

When:
Friday, 11 January 2019
6:00pm to 7:00pm
(GMT-08:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:
Mel's Diner, 1730 Grass Valley Hwy, Auburn

Description:
Monthly SFARC Board meeting. The venue may change from time to time ... Inquire on the repeater or www.W6EK.org for updates

View Event

General Meeting - Fri, 01/11/2019 7:30pm-9:30pm #cal-reminder

sfarc@w6ek.groups.io Calendar <sfarc@...>
 

Reminder:
General Meeting

When:
Friday, 11 January 2019
7:30pm to 9:30pm
(GMT-08:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:
1225 Lincoln Way, Auburn, CA - City Hall, Rose Room

Description:
Come a little early and visit! Ample parking in back of the building. See map at http://www.w6ek.org for details (Hwy49 & Lincoln Way)

View Event

Re: Field Day Site Review Meeting #fieldday

Brian Gohl - AI6US
 

Hello Jef,

We missed having you at the meeting last night. We had a great round table discussion and are needing to collect more location information before presenting the recomnendations to the Field Day Committee. Give me a call for more details.

Will definately let you know the scheduled date for the Field Day planning meeting. 

Best Regards! 
Brian Gohl - AI6US 
(916) 770-7751 cell

-------- Original message --------
From: Jef Allbright <jef@...>
Date: 1/9/19 12:41 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io, "Brian Gohl (AI6US)" <ai6us@...>
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] Field Day Site Review Meeting #fieldday

Just I realized I missed the Field Day review meeting yesterday.  

Please keep me in mind for next time.

- Jef  N5JEF

On Sat, Dec 29, 2018 at 1:35 PM Brian Gohl - AI6US <ai6us@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Happy New Year!

The first Field Day Site review meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 8th, 6:00pm at Denny's Restaurant, 681 Newcastle Rd, Newcastle, CA 95658. You are invited to come early for coffee, to eat and visit!

In this first meeting we will discuss site access, public visibility, technical needs and general Field Day event goals. We will review the suitability of the current location at the Nyak Shell station's recreation area and if decided, create a list of alternative FD locations.

If we wish to consider alternative locations, we will then arrange site surveys during January / February and determine if the sites would better meet the event needs, wishes and goals. Prior to the Field Day planning committee meeting to organize the 2019 FD event, we may meet again to review the site surveys and make prepare a site recommendation to present to the membership and FD committee for their consideration.

I look forward to seeing you there! Please bring your observations, ideas and suggestions. Looking forward to a great meeting as we review past FD challenges, successes!

Thank you in advance for participating in this important planning!
--
Brian- AI6US
916-770-7751 cell


--
Brian- AI6US

Re: Field Day Site Review Meeting #fieldday

Jef - N5JEF
 

Just I realized I missed the Field Day review meeting yesterday.  

Please keep me in mind for next time.

- Jef  N5JEF

On Sat, Dec 29, 2018 at 1:35 PM Brian Gohl - AI6US <ai6us@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Happy New Year!

The first Field Day Site review meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 8th, 6:00pm at Denny's Restaurant, 681 Newcastle Rd, Newcastle, CA 95658. You are invited to come early for coffee, to eat and visit!

In this first meeting we will discuss site access, public visibility, technical needs and general Field Day event goals. We will review the suitability of the current location at the Nyak Shell station's recreation area and if decided, create a list of alternative FD locations.

If we wish to consider alternative locations, we will then arrange site surveys during January / February and determine if the sites would better meet the event needs, wishes and goals. Prior to the Field Day planning committee meeting to organize the 2019 FD event, we may meet again to review the site surveys and make prepare a site recommendation to present to the membership and FD committee for their consideration.

I look forward to seeing you there! Please bring your observations, ideas and suggestions. Looking forward to a great meeting as we review past FD challenges, successes!

Thank you in advance for participating in this important planning!
--
Brian- AI6US
916-770-7751 cell

SFARC Net - Thu, 01/10/2019 7:30pm-8:30pm #cal-reminder

sfarc@w6ek.groups.io Calendar <sfarc@...>
 

Reminder:
SFARC Net

When:
Thursday, 10 January 2019
7:30pm to 8:30pm
(GMT-08:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:
W6EK Repeater - 145.430 -600, PL162.2

Description:
Check-in for Club updates from Officers and members, QSTs and more. Everyone is welcome!

View Event

Re: HF rig died and looking for an inexpensive replacement

Greg D
 

Hi Alan,

Sorry to hear about your rig.  What happened to it (what died)?  How much are you thinking to spend?  It might be better to fix the 757, perhaps with some technical help from the club.

Greg  KO6TH


Alan Mount wrote:

My Yaesu FT-757GX died after 35 years and I'm not in a position to buy a new rig or even a recent model used one to replace it as I am on a fixed income and barely getting by.
Anyone have an older but still operating HF rig they might part with with for little in the way of cash?

Thanks and 73

Alan N6HMK

HF rig died and looking for an inexpensive replacement

Alan Mount
 

My Yaesu FT-757GX died after 35 years and I'm not in a position to buy a new rig or even a recent model used one to replace it as I am on a fixed income and barely getting by.
Anyone have an older but still operating HF rig they might part with with for little in the way of cash?

Thanks and 73

Alan N6HMK

ARRL RTTY Roundup - Sat, 01/05/2019 10:00am to Sun, 01/06/2019 4:00pm #cal-reminder

sfarc@w6ek.groups.io Calendar <sfarc@...>
 

Reminder:
ARRL RTTY Roundup

When:
Saturday, 5 January 2019 10:00am to
Sunday, 6 January 2019 4:00pm
(GMT-08:00) America/Los Angeles

Description:
This is actually a "digital" contest event: Amateurs worldwide contact and exchange QSO information with other amateurs using digital modes (Baudot RTTY, PSK, FT8, ASCII, AMTOR, Packet—attended operation only) on 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meter bands.
This is a 150w or less contest, so the playing field is somewhat leveled.
When: Begins 1800 UTC Saturday, ends 2359  UTC Sunday (January 5-6).
ExchangeUnited States: Signal report and State (except for KH6 and KL7 who compete as DX Entities and will send serial numbers).

Full rules: http://www.arrl.org/rtty-roundup

View Event

Re: Radio job just posted at Placer County

Jef - N5JEF
 

Scott -

By the way, when I was hired, I too had a commercial FCC license and Amateur Extra, and had been self-employed doing something very similar to business development for the previous ten years. 

I've been a technical geek (especially radio and software development) pretty much all my life, but had little direct experience with P25 besides being familiar with the theory and programming some radios for the fire department. Networking experience I gained in the course of business, but I was never an assigned radio or IT professional.

I can say that the position requirements describe the hypothetical "ideal candidate", and everyone is different.  If you're interested, go with what you have and throw your hat in the ring...  

- Jef



On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:58 AM Scott Michael Vogelsang <s.m.vogels@...> wrote:
Jef.

I am interested in this job, hold an FCC Commercial Radio License as well as an Extra class ham ticket.
I do not have recent experience in the field they are asking and very little P-25 experience.

Can you assist me in getting experience and/or a foot in the door here?
I have been transitioning from working in business development in the SF Bay Area since 2013 and have recently moved back to Roseville with my wife... we are both starting again in Placer County.

\Scott Vogelsang
wa6yne
Scott Michael Vogelsang
"Solving Problems
       Identifying Opportunities."
S.F.Bay Region 415-234-9400 Mobile
Capitol Corridor 916-212-0400 Home
PO Box 341190 * Sacramento CA 95834

Google wins FCC approval to keep developing radar-based hand sensor 1/2/19

Scott M Vogelsang
 

Project Soli can operate at higher power levels than currently allowed.
https://www.engadget.com/2019/01/02/google-wins-fcc-approval-to-keep-developing-radar-based-hand-sen/
This is one of many near-field RF projects being developed for industry and consumer products. This particular development uses the 60 GHZ band and was operating at less than -100 db RF power at the source. No reference to what the new ERP is allowed.  
Like WiFi routers in ham bands using RF chip sets, I hope there is technology to open the software on new tech to allow greater application in ham bands... much like the emergency data nets on ham bands, by hams, in the SoCal area.  At these frequencies I don't believe there are restriction on the modulation mode.

Re: Radio job just posted at Placer County

Scott M Vogelsang
 

Jef.

I am interested in this job, hold an FCC Commercial Radio License as well as an Extra class ham ticket.
I do not have recent experience in the field they are asking and very little P-25 experience.

Can you assist me in getting experience and/or a foot in the door here?
I have been transitioning from working in business development in the SF Bay Area since 2013 and have recently moved back to Roseville with my wife... we are both starting again in Placer County.

\Scott Vogelsang
wa6yne
Scott Michael Vogelsang
"Solving Problems
       Identifying Opportunities."
S.F.Bay Region 415-234-9400 Mobile
Capitol Corridor 916-212-0400 Home
PO Box 341190 * Sacramento CA 95834

Radio job just posted at Placer County

Jef - N5JEF
 

This position just posted on the Placer County jobs website.  I'd love to see a skilled ham, someone who truly enjoys radio and related technology--join the team here.  Please pass along to any likely candidates.


"Placer County Information Technology's Telecommunications Division is seeking a radio system professional. Working in a team environment, this position is responsible for designing, implementing, operating and maintaining the Placer County P-25 digital trunked land mobile radio system and subscriber units; conventional analog land mobile radio systems; microwave network; Public-Safety Answering Point (PSAP) and dispatch center. This position will work closely with the County's telecom service providers and internal County customers, as well as maintenance vendors. The radio system network consists of products from Motorola, Hewlett Packard, Aviat, NICE and Kenwood.

Ideal candidates should have in-depth knowledge of radio frequency theory, technologies, troubleshooting, installation, programming and maintenance in both conventional and trunking systems; as well as a thorough understanding of networking concepts, subscriber unit programming, system optimization and interference mitigation.

Additionally, the ideal candidate should be experienced and skilled in vendor/partner management, project management, customer service and have excellent problem solving and troubleshooting skills. While this position is stationed in Auburn, some travel to other work locations throughout Placer County, including Tahoe, Lincoln and Roseville areas is required.

Possession of an FCC General Radio Operator’s License and other industry certifications are desirable but not required."


- Jef  N5JEF

Re: China on the Moon

Gerry - WA6E
 

Thanks, Pat.  I had no idea you could orbit in that manner.

Gerry
WA6E

On 1/4/2019 7:38 AM, Patrick Barthelow wrote:
here is a NASA paper that describes in general-detail the concept of  an L-2 Lunar Orbiting Relay Sat:

Background for Communications Architecture for the Chinese far side of the moon Queiqiao lander experiment:

Project Echo:
Electronic Communications from Halo Orbit.
NASA-USRA Advance Design Program
Penn State U. 1993-94

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19950006231.pdf



Best, 73,   Pat Barthelow AA6EG
apolloeme@...

"The most exciting phrase to hear in Science, the one that heralds
new discoveries,  is not "Eureka, I have found it!"    but:

"That's funny..."  ----Isaac Asimov 




On Fri, Jan 4, 2019 at 4:14 AM Mark Graybill <saundby@...> wrote:
Good one Dennis. Look for Moon Mushrooms at a market near you soon.

Greg got it exactly right. The Chinese have a satellite orbiting the L2 point, which is on the far side of the moon, and that puts the satellite into what we call a 'halo' orbit. I always has a view of the far side.

Landing on the far side of the Moon gives the Chinese a 'first', as neither the US or the Russians ever landed anything there.

There is no direct military value to this mission. Other than showing off the Chinese launch and control capabilities. China's military goals are met directly, they don't hide behind science missions. They had 35 launches last year, many military.

They observe our satellites capably using ground and ship-based radars. Going 238,000 miles away to observe satellites that are ~100-400 miles above the surface would be counterproductive.

Mark, W8BIT


On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 10:54 Dennis - WU6X <wu6x@...> wrote:
Personally, I think they will be growing mushrooms on a massive scale. These will be hallucinogenic and sold thru Chinese vegetable markets near you. 😊

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> on behalf of Greg D <ko6th.greg@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 10:19 AM
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; gjbrent@...
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] China on the Moon
 
Hi Gerry,

The short answer to "How" is that they earlier sent another satellite
which remains in orbit around the Moon, and it acts as a relay.  I
believe that satellite also has a ham radio package on board, and many
have received the signals back here on Earth.  They do testing of it on
occasional weekends, but haven't recently probably because of the
landing operations.

As for "Why", I doubt it's for any direct military reasons.  As you
note, there's no direct view of the Earth from that site, and no obvious
targets farther out in space.  Indirectly, however, it's very certainly
a matter of Chinese pride and international prestige.  Sort of a space
race that they're playing with the rest of the world's space faring
nations.  It's also a national challenge of sorts, which benefits the
development of Chinese-owned technology, just as the original space race
of the 1960's led to complex integrated circuits, GPS satellites, smart
phones, and orange-flavored drinks of questionable heritage.

The "dark" side of the Moon, of course, isn't dark.  It's just not
visible from Earth.  When the side we face is dark, because it's facing
away from the Sun, then the back side is bathed in brilliant sunshine.
The phrase "Dark side of the Moon" is only significant as a record album
title.

By the way, be sure to look skyward on the evening of Sunday, January
20th, when there will be a total eclipse of the Moon.  This is where the
Earth passes exactly in the way between the Sun and the Moon, casting
its shadow across the entirety of the Moon's surface.  Should be quite
something to watch.  The NC Astronomers club will be holding a "Star
Party" that evening at the intersection of Old Downieville Highway and
SR 49, just outside of Nevada City (a quick 30 minute drive from
Auburn).  All are welcome to attend and look through our telescopes at
the Moon, or whatever else might catch our attention in the night sky.

Greg  KO6TH


Gerry Brentnall wrote:
> In the news today is that the Chinese apparently landed a spacecraft
> on the dark side of the moon.  Other than wondering "why" they did
> that, I have a question for Mark and Greg and any others
> space/satellite interested:  How do they get their signals back to
> earth from the dark side of the moon?  That side never sees the earth
> and the high frequency signals they use for comm won't penetrate the
> moon.
>
> As to the "why," one article said they wanted a base on the moon for
> military purposes so they could look down on our high-orbit satellites
> and take them out in case of a conflict.  I can see that as an
> argument for a base on the side of the moon facing earth, but the dark
> side?  What am I missing?
>
> Gerry
> WA6E
>
>
>





--
Dennis - WU6X

Re: China on the Moon

Gerry - WA6E
 

Mark-

What is the L2 point?  Is this like a satellite orbiting directly above the equator?  I'm trying to envision an orbit that would allow a satellite to see one hemisphere of the moon at all times.  I can see a highly elliptical orbit being able to see one side for a long period of the orbit, but not 100% of the time.

Gerry
WA6E

On 1/4/2019 4:14 AM, Mark Graybill wrote:
Good one Dennis. Look for Moon Mushrooms at a market near you soon.

Greg got it exactly right. The Chinese have a satellite orbiting the L2 point, which is on the far side of the moon, and that puts the satellite into what we call a 'halo' orbit. I always has a view of the far side.

Landing on the far side of the Moon gives the Chinese a 'first', as neither the US or the Russians ever landed anything there.

There is no direct military value to this mission. Other than showing off the Chinese launch and control capabilities. China's military goals are met directly, they don't hide behind science missions. They had 35 launches last year, many military.

They observe our satellites capably using ground and ship-based radars. Going 238,000 miles away to observe satellites that are ~100-400 miles above the surface would be counterproductive.

Mark, W8BIT


On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 10:54 Dennis - WU6X <wu6x@...> wrote:
Personally, I think they will be growing mushrooms on a massive scale. These will be hallucinogenic and sold thru Chinese vegetable markets near you. 😊

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> on behalf of Greg D <ko6th.greg@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 10:19 AM
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; gjbrent@...
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] China on the Moon
 
Hi Gerry,

The short answer to "How" is that they earlier sent another satellite
which remains in orbit around the Moon, and it acts as a relay.  I
believe that satellite also has a ham radio package on board, and many
have received the signals back here on Earth.  They do testing of it on
occasional weekends, but haven't recently probably because of the
landing operations.

As for "Why", I doubt it's for any direct military reasons.  As you
note, there's no direct view of the Earth from that site, and no obvious
targets farther out in space.  Indirectly, however, it's very certainly
a matter of Chinese pride and international prestige.  Sort of a space
race that they're playing with the rest of the world's space faring
nations.  It's also a national challenge of sorts, which benefits the
development of Chinese-owned technology, just as the original space race
of the 1960's led to complex integrated circuits, GPS satellites, smart
phones, and orange-flavored drinks of questionable heritage.

The "dark" side of the Moon, of course, isn't dark.  It's just not
visible from Earth.  When the side we face is dark, because it's facing
away from the Sun, then the back side is bathed in brilliant sunshine.
The phrase "Dark side of the Moon" is only significant as a record album
title.

By the way, be sure to look skyward on the evening of Sunday, January
20th, when there will be a total eclipse of the Moon.  This is where the
Earth passes exactly in the way between the Sun and the Moon, casting
its shadow across the entirety of the Moon's surface.  Should be quite
something to watch.  The NC Astronomers club will be holding a "Star
Party" that evening at the intersection of Old Downieville Highway and
SR 49, just outside of Nevada City (a quick 30 minute drive from
Auburn).  All are welcome to attend and look through our telescopes at
the Moon, or whatever else might catch our attention in the night sky.

Greg  KO6TH


Gerry Brentnall wrote:
> In the news today is that the Chinese apparently landed a spacecraft
> on the dark side of the moon.  Other than wondering "why" they did
> that, I have a question for Mark and Greg and any others
> space/satellite interested:  How do they get their signals back to
> earth from the dark side of the moon?  That side never sees the earth
> and the high frequency signals they use for comm won't penetrate the
> moon.
>
> As to the "why," one article said they wanted a base on the moon for
> military purposes so they could look down on our high-orbit satellites
> and take them out in case of a conflict.  I can see that as an
> argument for a base on the side of the moon facing earth, but the dark
> side?  What am I missing?
>
> Gerry
> WA6E
>
>
>





--
Dennis - WU6X

Re: China on the Moon

Greg D
 

Great article, thanks!

But, 1993?  Is that really the date, or something else?

Greg  KO6TH


Patrick Barthelow wrote:

here is a NASA paper that describes in general-detail the concept of  an L-2 Lunar Orbiting Relay Sat:

Background for Communications Architecture for the Chinese far side of the moon Queiqiao lander experiment:

Project Echo:
Electronic Communications from Halo Orbit.
NASA-USRA Advance Design Program
Penn State U. 1993-94

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19950006231.pdf



Best, 73,   Pat Barthelow AA6EG
apolloeme@...

"The most exciting phrase to hear in Science, the one that heralds
new discoveries,  is not "Eureka, I have found it!"    but:

"That's funny..."  ----Isaac Asimov 




On Fri, Jan 4, 2019 at 4:14 AM Mark Graybill <saundby@...> wrote:
Good one Dennis. Look for Moon Mushrooms at a market near you soon.

Greg got it exactly right. The Chinese have a satellite orbiting the L2 point, which is on the far side of the moon, and that puts the satellite into what we call a 'halo' orbit. I always has a view of the far side.

Landing on the far side of the Moon gives the Chinese a 'first', as neither the US or the Russians ever landed anything there.

There is no direct military value to this mission. Other than showing off the Chinese launch and control capabilities. China's military goals are met directly, they don't hide behind science missions. They had 35 launches last year, many military.

They observe our satellites capably using ground and ship-based radars. Going 238,000 miles away to observe satellites that are ~100-400 miles above the surface would be counterproductive.

Mark, W8BIT


On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 10:54 Dennis - WU6X <wu6x@...> wrote:
Personally, I think they will be growing mushrooms on a massive scale. These will be hallucinogenic and sold thru Chinese vegetable markets near you. 😊

From: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io <sfarc@w6ek.groups.io> on behalf of Greg D <ko6th.greg@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 10:19 AM
To: sfarc@w6ek.groups.io; gjbrent@...
Subject: Re: [from W6EK Groups.io] China on the Moon
 
Hi Gerry,

The short answer to "How" is that they earlier sent another satellite
which remains in orbit around the Moon, and it acts as a relay.  I
believe that satellite also has a ham radio package on board, and many
have received the signals back here on Earth.  They do testing of it on
occasional weekends, but haven't recently probably because of the
landing operations.

As for "Why", I doubt it's for any direct military reasons.  As you
note, there's no direct view of the Earth from that site, and no obvious
targets farther out in space.  Indirectly, however, it's very certainly
a matter of Chinese pride and international prestige.  Sort of a space
race that they're playing with the rest of the world's space faring
nations.  It's also a national challenge of sorts, which benefits the
development of Chinese-owned technology, just as the original space race
of the 1960's led to complex integrated circuits, GPS satellites, smart
phones, and orange-flavored drinks of questionable heritage.

The "dark" side of the Moon, of course, isn't dark.  It's just not
visible from Earth.  When the side we face is dark, because it's facing
away from the Sun, then the back side is bathed in brilliant sunshine.
The phrase "Dark side of the Moon" is only significant as a record album
title.

By the way, be sure to look skyward on the evening of Sunday, January
20th, when there will be a total eclipse of the Moon.  This is where the
Earth passes exactly in the way between the Sun and the Moon, casting
its shadow across the entirety of the Moon's surface.  Should be quite
something to watch.  The NC Astronomers club will be holding a "Star
Party" that evening at the intersection of Old Downieville Highway and
SR 49, just outside of Nevada City (a quick 30 minute drive from
Auburn).  All are welcome to attend and look through our telescopes at
the Moon, or whatever else might catch our attention in the night sky.

Greg  KO6TH


Gerry Brentnall wrote:
> In the news today is that the Chinese apparently landed a spacecraft
> on the dark side of the moon.  Other than wondering "why" they did
> that, I have a question for Mark and Greg and any others
> space/satellite interested:  How do they get their signals back to
> earth from the dark side of the moon?  That side never sees the earth
> and the high frequency signals they use for comm won't penetrate the
> moon.
>
> As to the "why," one article said they wanted a base on the moon for
> military purposes so they could look down on our high-orbit satellites
> and take them out in case of a conflict.  I can see that as an
> argument for a base on the side of the moon facing earth, but the dark
> side?  What am I missing?
>
> Gerry
> WA6E
>
>
>





--
Dennis - WU6X