Coronavirus and misinformation that is floating around like airborne cooties


Jim - N6MED
 

Full disclosure for those in the club that don’t know my background:
I am a registered nurse, retired from the Auburn Faith Hospital telemetry medical unit. “Telemetry medical” pertains to acute care for those who have a primary medical condition with an underlying heart condition.

For the Common Good, with permission of the group, I’m frustrated by so much misinformation “out there” put forth by the ignorant in the media. By BS meter starts bouncing in the red zone as soon as I hear someone say “I heard that …” without citing the source.

Regardless of your favorite media outlet, whether cable, broadcast, FaceBook, Twitter, or whatever, I hold the opinion that the only reliable information on SARS-Cov-2 (the cootie, a Coronavirus) and COVID-19 (the disease one gets) is from medical and scientific resources. There are many of these, including but certainly not limited to the CDC, WHO, Johns-Hopkins, Stanford Medical, etc. etc. Certainly the medical and scientific experts reporting on the media are reliable sources, e.g., Dr. Fauci, Dr. Birx, Dr. Gupta (though a neurologist know what questions to ask of his expert colleagues). I’ve found off-shore resources as well that have reliable info based on science.

With all the conversation relating to droplet and contact precautions, there is a lot of confusion (and even inconsistent term usage by doctors) regarding “airborne,” “aerosol,” and “droplet.” Now, with the cautions re infected folks shedding virus (i.e., being infectious) several days before they are symptomatic, the term “airborne” becomes even clouded.

In the context of “airborne” I think of Legionnaires disease which was spread through the HVAC system of the convention facility/hotel in 1976 (Ref: https://www.medicinenet.com/legionnaire_disease_and_pontiac_fever/article.htm). Also, measles and TB where contagion (i.e., infectious particles) dwell time in the air can be anywhere from 30 min to several hours. “Aerosole” is that fine mist that accompanies the spray of a sneeze or speaks (the latter that is currently cited by the CDC as the means of transmission of asymptomatic infected individuals).

According to recent research at Virginia Tech, Linsey Marr, an aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still so it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter." Even a 5 micrometer droplet can linger in the air. "If the air were perfectly still, it would take a half hour to fall from a height of 6 feet down to the ground. And, of course, the air isn't perfectly still," says Marr. "So it can easily be blown around during that time and stay in the air for longer or shorter."
(Refs re airborne, aerosol, and droplet: https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/04/03/825639323/scientists-probe-how-coronavirus-might-travel-through-the-air)

http://ata-medical.com/2017/04/03/what-is-airborne-transmission/

https://emcrit.org/ibcc/covid19/#transmission

 

Contact is, well, contact, i.e., touching an inanimate object that has been contaminated either by an infected individual transferring cooties to it (poorly washed hands touching a surface) or droplets from a sneeze or cough.  

We just watched the movie (available on Netflix) Contagion. Besides the usual dramatization, Hollywood did it right. Released in 2011, IMHO, it offers a realistic portrayal of what we are facing right now. Fortunately, the mortality rate (thus far) is much less than that depicted in the movie.

If you’ve hung in here with me this far, you deserve a chuckle. Enjoy this bit from Jimmy Kimmel and Samuel L. Jackson:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSrbxyna4z4


Lastly, a link Dennis WU6X passed onto me: https://ncov2019.live/


It's all about science where it's better to figure stuff out than make shit up. Jus' sayin'

Stay well!!!
Jim / N6MED

 

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